A Slow Drag of the Greenrush

Cannabis Day, sorry I mean Canada Day 2018, has been a long time coming for many Canadians. Since the Liberal Party proposed legalization of cannabis back in 2012, and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau adopted the legalization as part of his campaign platform, many Canadians have been patiently waiting to see what will become of Bill C-45; more commonly known as the Cannabis Act (Parliament of Canada, 2017).

The Cannabis Act, when combined with Bill C-46 An Act to Amend the Criminal Code, essentially decriminalizes the possession, sale, production and consumption of cannabis (Government of Canada, 2017). Fresh cannabis, dried cannabis, cannabis oils, cannabis creams, infused cannabis beverages, cannabis seeds, cannabis plants, will be available from either a provincially or territorially regulated retailer, or directly from a federally licensed producer. Individuals will also be allowed to cultivate up to 4 plants at home and bake magic brownies! I mean, “prepare various types of cannabis products for personal use” (Government of Canada, 2017).

Originating from Central Asia, the two most widely cultivated and economically important species are Cannabis sativa and Cannabis indica (Andre et al., 2016; Thomas & Elsohly, 2016). A fast-growing annual crop, cannabis is a gold mine of phytochemicals and a rich source of cellulosic and woody fibers (Andre et al., 2016).  The most researched cannabis phytochemicals, or cannabinoids, are delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and cannabidiol (CBD) (McLellan et al., 2016). CBD is of particular interest in the medical community for its anti-inflammatory properties as well as the treatment of pain, spasms, asthma, insomnia, depression, loss of appetite, epilepsy and Tourette syndrome (Elsas, 2009; Müller-Vahl, 2015). For those people who are more interested in brighter colours and better sounding music, THC is the compound to thank for its psychoactive effects.

However, the pharmaceutical industry is not the only industry interested in cannabis production. Lighter and stronger than polypropylene plastic, cannabis bast fiber is of particular interest in the automotive industry (Andre et al., 2016).  Additionally, the woody fibers from cannabis have high absorption capacity and can be used for animal bedding, and the stem can be used as a source of fiber with antibacterial properties.

Canada has one of the highest rates of cannabis use in the world, with 40 percent of Canadians admitting to having used cannabis despite the associated criminal penalties (Government of Canada, 2017; Sen, 2016). Once cannabis is legalized, one study estimates combined tax revenues as high as $5 billion a year (Shenfeld, 2016). A definitive price for current black-market cannabis is hard to determine, although estimates for legal market medical and recreational cannabis fall around $8 per gram (Israel, 2017).

To get a piece of the pie, all producers of cannabis or cannabis products will need to be federally licensed to operate (Government of Canada, 2017). At this moment, there are 90 licensed producers in Canada, the two biggest players being Ontario with 48 licenced producers and British Columbia with 19 (Government of Canada, 2018).  And in Quebec? Six. In 2017, 25 producers were licenced in Ontario. How many producers were licenced last year in Quebec? Three. Does Ontario know something we don’t?

The Cannabis Act is not only making Canadian history, but it is opening doors of opportunity. The market is new. The market is exciting. The market is developing. But to keep the market competitive, and to keep the market diverse, there needs to be more involvement from small producers, family farms, and entrepreneurs. In Quebec there are currently 247 greenhouse vegetable farms, all with similar products, competing in the same market (Statistics Canada, 2017). If you’re one of them, and you need to diversify, well, here’s the opportunity. Or maybe you’re an entrepreneur with a vision. Whatever your angle, it’s time to get involved. And personally, I’d like to see involvement from every province.

 

References:

Andre, C. M., Hausman, J.F., & Guerriero, G. 2016. Cannabis sativa: The Plant of the Thousand and One Molecules. Frontiers in Plant Science 2016 (7):19.

Elsas, Siegward-M. 2009. Complementary and Alternative Therapies and the Aging Population. Academic Press, 2009, 83-96.

Government of Canada. 2017. Introduction of the Cannabis Act: Questions and Answers. Government of Canada, Ottawa, ON. Available at https://www.canada.ca/en/services/health/campaigns/introduction-cannabis-act-questions-answers.html#a8 (accessed 17 February 2018).

Government of Canada. 2018. Authorized Licensed Producers of Cannabis for Medical Purposes. Government of Canada, Ottawa, ON. Available at https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/drugs-health-products/medical-use-marijuana/licensed-producers/authorized-licensed-producers-medical-purposes.html (accessed 17 February 2018).

Israel, Solomon. 2017. How high will the price of legal pot be? CBC News, Montreal, QC. Available at http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/canada-marijuana-legalization-price-1.4047530 (accessed 17 February 2018).

McLellan, A.A, Ware, M.A., Boyd, S., Chow, G., Jesso, M., Kendall, P., Souccar, R., von Tigerstrom, B., & Zahn, C. 2016. A Framework for the Legalization and Regulation of Cannabis in Canada. Government of Canada, Ottawa, ON. Available at https://www.canada.ca/en/services/health/marijuana-cannabis/task-force-marijuana-legalization-regulation/framework-legalization-regulation-cannabis-in-canada.html?_ga=2.183901285.215878009.1506978977-195686444.1487610150#a2 (accessed 17 February 2018).

Müller-Vahl, Kirsten R. 2015. Cannabinois in Neurologic and Mental Disease. Academic Press, 2015, 227-245.

Parliament of Canada. 2017. Bill C-45: An Act respecting cannabis and to amend the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, the Criminal Code and other Acts. Parliament of Canada, Ottawa, ON. Available at http://www.parl.ca/DocumentViewer/en/42-1/bill/C-45/third-reading (accessed 17 February 2018).

Sen, Anindya. 2016. Joint Venture: A Blueprint for Federal and Provincial Marijuana Policy. C.D. Howe Institute, Toronto, ON. Available at https://www.cdhowe.org/sites/default/files/attachments/research_papers/mixed/e-brief_235.pdf (accessed 17 February 2018).

Shenfeld, Avery. 2016. Growing Their Own Revenue: The Fiscal Impacts of Cannabis Legalization. CIBC World Markets Inc., Toronto, ON. Available at http://research.cibcwm.com/economic_public/download/eijan16.pdf (accessed 17 February 2018).

Statistics Canada. 2017. Estimates of specialized greenhouse operations, greenhouse area, and month of operation. Statistics Canada, Ottawa, ON. Available at http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a47 (accessed 18 February 2018).

Thomas, B.F., & Elsohly, M.A. 2016. The Analytical Chemistry of Cannabis. Elsevier Inc., Amsterdams, NL.

5 responses to “A Slow Drag of the Greenrush”

  1. William Overbeek says:

    Le titre de cet article est accrocheur et aide facilement à repérer le sujet du texte. L’article essaie de démontrer à travers quelques jeux de mots bien placés, que la légalisation du cannabis apportera beaucoup de nouveautéé dans le marché canadien, spécialement pour les futurs producteurs de cannabis. Le faible nombre de futurs producteurs québécois comparé au nombre de futurs producteurs ontariens est particulièrement intéressant et je crois que l’auteur pose une bonne question en se demandant quelles sont les raisons pour cette différence dans le nombre de futurs producteurs. Durant le début du texte, certains jeux de mots au sujet du cannabis sont utilisés ce qui donne une attitude comique au texte, rendant celui-ci léger et agréable à lire. Je crois que le texte aurait pu mettre une emphase un peu plus grande l’aspect de la production du cannabis. Par exemple, lorsqu’il est mentionné que la fibre du cannabis pourrait être utilisée, il serait intéressant de savoir comment celle-ci sera ramassée, avec la production en serre du cannabis, est-ce qu’une machine existe pour récolter la fibre à l’intérieur d’une serre et comment se compare ce mode de production comparé à la fibre de chanvre, une plante de la même espèce. La mention que certains producteurs horticoles pourraient commencer la production de cannabis au sein de leur entreprise me semblait intéressante. Il sera pertinent de voir comment les régulations sur la production et la vente seront installées et s’il serait possible pour certains producteurs de créer de petites productions locales, un peu comme les microbrasseries se sont développées durant les dernières années. Somme toute, le texte apporte une bonne dose d’humour, d’informations et de questionnements sur la légalisation de la marijuana, spécialement sur le rôle des petits producteurs dans cette production.

  2. elianewubbolts says:

    Very well written blog post! The title is well thought of since it provides an intrigue with the use of “Greenrush” and it is perceptive allowing us to perceive the author’s point of view on the subject. This post highlights the slow progress of the legalization of cannabis since the idea was proposed in 2012. The author projects cannabis in a positive light and describes its usefulness to the population. I can almost feel a sense of impatience by the author for the lack of participation of Quebec producers to enter this new market.
    I believe the author is giving us positive arguments as an incentive for producers to start up this production for which there seems to be a popularity in Canada compared to the world market. This article strikes our interest with the diversity of the current productions across Canada and offers an inviting message about cannabis. The strong aspect of this post is that it provides us with a description of the Cannabis Act and how this product can be used in alternative ways on the market. I was surprised by the benefits and usefulness of this plant, especially for the animal bedding. To improve this article, I would have included details on the best way to start up in this production, and how it could be integrated in the 247 greenhouse vegetable farms as mentioned in the blog post. A statement that caught my attention was that there are only 6 licensed producers of cannabis in Quebec making me wonder what explains the interprovincial differences in this production. Furthermore, having practical details might inspire a true interest by producers reading the post, and might make them realise the feasibility as well as the profitability of starting a cannabis project on their enterprise.

  3. Ingrid Laplante says:

    Super intéressant, le titre de l’article est accrocheur et soulève la curiosité. L’article est bien écrit et nous présente avec une pincée d’humour quelques faits saillants de ce sujet d’actualité qui en fait danser plus d’un. En effet, au Canada l’engouement face à la légalisation du cannabis est palpable alors que plusieurs investisseurs d’ici et d’ailleurs s’engagent dans le marché. Engouement qu’on ressent aussi chez l’auteur, alors qu’il soulève les différentes avenues de la plante. C’est d’ailleurs sous une description positive de la plante et de ses produits et bienfaits que l’auteur nous présente la venue sur le marché du cannabis. J’ai été surprise d’apprendre que la fibre du cannabis avait des propriétés antibactériennes et que certaines de ses molécules pouvaient même avoir un impact sur le syndrome de Gilles la Tourette. Bref, il est clair que la production de cannabis est un secteur intéressant pour tout âme qui se sent d’entreprendre un projet lucratif.
    D’un autre côté, l’auteur nous éclaire face à la forte disparité qu’il y a entre le nombre de lancement d’entreprise dans les différentes provinces. Le pays est grand et pourtant seul deux provinces possèdent actuellement la quasi-totalité des licences de production. Le Québec n’en fait pas partie. L’auteur nous invite ainsi à prendre part à ce marché grandissant qui risque de créer d’importantes retombées économiques. Un des arguments forts de l’auteur est l’importance d’encourager l’investissement dans ce domaine à tous les niveaux, pour assurer une compétition saine du marché. Par ailleurs, bien que je puisse voir l’intérêt entrepreneurial, du point de vue de la souveraineté alimentaire, je ne suis pas certaine qu’il soit positif d’encourager nos producteurs de légumes à faire la transition. Il aurait été intéressant d’aborder les différences de législation entre les provinces. C’est peut- être à ce niveau qu’on freine l’engouement ?

  4. Ingrid Laplante says:

    Super intéressant, le titre de l’article est accrocheur et soulève la curiosité. L’article est bien écrit et nous présente avec une pincée d’humour quelques faits saillants de ce sujet d’actualité qui en fait danser plus d’un. En effet, au Canada l’engouement face à la légalisation du cannabis est palpable alors que plusieurs investisseurs d’ici et d’ailleurs s’engagent dans le marché. Engouement qu’on ressent aussi chez l’auteur qui soulève le potentiel entrepreneurial lie à la production. C’est d’ailleurs sous une description positive de la plante et de ses produits et bienfaits que l’auteur nous présente la venue sur le marché du cannabis. J’ai été surprise d’apprendre que la fibre du cannabis avait des propriétés antibactériennes et que certaines de ses molécules pouvaient même avoir un impact sur le syndrome de Gilles la Tourette. Bref, il est clair que la production de cannabis est un secteur intéressant pour tout âme qui se sent d’entreprendre un projet lucratif.
    D’un autre côté, l’auteur nous éclaire face à la forte disparité qu’il y a entre le nombre de lancement d’entreprise dans les différentes provinces. Seul deux provinces possèdent actuellement la quasi-totalité des licences de production. Le Québec n’en fait pas partie. L’auteur nous invite ainsi à prendre part à ce marché grandissant qui risque de créer d’importantes retombées économiques. Un des arguments forts de l’auteur est l’importance d’encourager l’investissement dans ce domaine à tous les niveaux, pour assurer une compétition saine du marché. Mais quels sont les premiers pas pour se lancer sur ce marché? Par ailleurs, du point de vue de la souveraineté alimentaire, je ne suis pas certaine qu’il soit positif d’encourager nos producteurs de légumes à faire la transition. Finalement, il aurait été intéressant d’aborder les différences de législation entre les provinces. C’est peut- être à ce niveau qu’on freine l’engouement ?

  5. Abu Mahdi Mia says:

    You can tell by the multiple comments on this post that the title is definitely a nice hook, it is very interesting and makes the reader want to continue reading. The timing for this post is also crucial to its popularity due to the soon coming legalization. Good choice!

    The take home message of this article is that the marijuana industry is the next gold rush and that keen-eyed entrepreneurs should get involved in it before it gets too hard to do so. The author also states that Quebec is somewhat slow in the trends of other provinces.

    The strongest aspect of this post is that the author properly states the economic merits of the marijuana industry and how it can be exploited by anyone this early on.

    One way to improve this blog post might be to add some statistics, although statistics are not always needed it shows that the author has done enough research to be well versed on the subject.

    This post does a good job in encapsulating all of marijuana’s benefits which slowly transitions into why it is going to be an economic marvel.

    If anything, I would only add some statistics into this blog posts more than just the potential revenues it could generate.

Leave a Reply

Blog authors are solely responsible for the content of the blogs listed in the directory. Neither the content of these blogs, nor the links to other web sites, are screened, approved, reviewed or endorsed by McGill University. The text and other material on these blogs are the opinion of the specific author and are not statements of advice, opinion, or information of McGill.