ACA Colloquium 2016

by Ben Wrubel and Annelise Dowd

 

On February 12th, students and faculty gathered at the School of Information Studies for the Association of Canadian Archivists’ McGill Student Chapter’s 9th Annual Winter Colloquium. The audience heard from a host of local archivists and librarians contending with the preservation of textual records, rare books, digital records, graphic materials, and sound recordings,and learned about the unique challenges that different formats and institutional settings bring to the field.

The first speaker was Shannon Hodge, Director of Archives at the Jewish Public Library Archives. Her presentation discussed the challenges of storing archival collections in a mixed use building. Stemming from her experiences of facing issues of mold and flooding at the JPL, she stressed the importance of communicating preservation concerns with facilities management and forming a comprehensive disaster plan before any of these “worst case scenarios” develop.

Ann Marie Holland, History of Printing Collections and Canadiana Collections/Liaison Librarian at McGill’s Rare Books and Special Collections, provided an overview of rare books preservation issues. Examples ranged from outsourcing material conservation to donor outreach for funding conservation projects. She left the audience with several websites to visit for more information regarding rare books conservation: http://www.nedcc.org, http://www.cool.conservation-us.org, http://www.cci-icc.gc.ca, http://www.rbms.info, and http://www.ifla.org/preservation-and-conservation.

 DSC_0050

 Tim Walsh, Archivist in the Digital Archives at the Canadian Centre for Architecture, detailed the legal, cultural, and technological challenges of born-digital bit preservation. Walsh spoke of how the CCA’s digital archival holdings often consist of proprietary 3-D modeling file formats, making software preservation, emulation, and user access major concerns.

Greg Houston, Digitization and New Media Administrator at McGill Library Digital Initiatives, walked the audience through the criteria for digitization and outlined the process of facilitating user access to digitized items via McGill Library’s catalog, the Internet Archive, and HathiTrust. Greg also shared a link to a Google Maps photosphere view of Digital Initiatives, which can be viewed here: https://goo.gl/maps/VcAs2UdFcxr.

DSC_0043

Offering a user’s perspective, Catherine Nygren, Research Assistant at the Burney Centre at McGill University, discussed the value of accurate and comprehensive metadata for facilitating researchers’ access to archives. In particular, she emphasized the financial and time limitations that many researchers face, and thus the high importance of digitized resources to be made accessible online.

The final speaker was Melissa Pipe, Documentation Technician at the Audiovisual Archives at McGill’s Marvin Duchow Music Library. Her presentation addressed the collaborative efforts of her department and McGill’s Sound Recording Program to preserve a collection of 78 rpm jazz records. From physical preservation and storage, to digitization and metadata creation, Melissa described the numerous informed decisions required of archivists for the preservation of sound recordings.

The students who were among those in the full School of Information Studies ballroom were privileged to hear the illuminating and diverse experiences of professionals in the archival field. The 2016 Winter Colloquium could not have been such a success without the professionals who took the time to present and the McGill ACA chapter’s tireless work organizing the event. Until next year!

DSC_0090

InfoNexus 2015 – Guest Post by Kayleigh Girard

On Friday, February 6th, we held the 2015 edition of the annual student-organized InfoNexus conference, formerly known as Web 2.U. The event was held in the Thomson House ballroom, and over the course of the day we had seven presentations from a diverse and truly fascinating group of speakers. This year’s conference did not have a formal theme, but the aim of the day was to bring students and information professionals together to share ideas and discover a range of topics from all over the information science world. In light of that, the speakers each brought their unique and varied backgrounds to their presentations.

IMG_3151

 

IMG_3168

 

IMG_3145

 

 

  • Nancy Naluz, Community Manager for the Montreal Chapter of Ladies Learning Code, spoke about how and why we can learn to code, and shared with us some tips for learning.

IMG_3144

  • Olivier Jarda, a McGill University law student, explored some of the issues and difficulties surrounding the searching, finding, and using of information in environmental law.
  • Patrick Brian Smith and Jesse David Dinneen, both PhD students, discussed their work in applying bibliometric techniques to film theory, and the challenges this work entails.

image[7]

  • David Heti, a stand-up comedian, spoke about the ways in which comedians manipulate information, as well as the audience’s expectations and values, while performing.

IMG_1445

  • Herman Tumurcuoglu, founder of Mamma.com and professor at Concordia University’s John Molson School of Business, gave us some strategies and ideas for applying reverse SEO techniques to deal with issues in online reputation.
  • Nathalie de Preux, Knowledge Management Advisor at Bombardier Aerospace, gave a presentation on the process of adopting a collaboration platform within a large organization in order to share information and expertise more effectively.
  • Alexandra Carruthers, a Digital Public Spaces Librarian at the Edmonton Public Library, shared her experiences in setting up a digital space for the Edmonton local music scene at her library (Capitol City Records).

 

I’d like to extend a big thank you to our attendees, our speakers, and our organizing team, for helping to make InfoNexus 2015 happen. If you have any thoughts, feedback, or ideas to share for next year’s conference, please feel free to contact us at infonexus-inform@gmail.com.

The Highlights from Web 2.U 2014

By Anastasia Prozorova

On Friday February 7, 2014, many information professionals, students and enthusiasts gathered at Thomson House for the annual student-organized conference, Web 2.U. The insightful speakers, who were invited to this day-long event, had a chance to share their thoughts on a variety of cool, but challenging media and on the role of information professionals in the changing world. Let me share with you some of the highlights from this year’s event:

  • Connie Crosby, a Toronto-based consultant, shared her experience in customer outreach and customer relationship management.
  • AJ West, a second-year student graduating from McGill’s MLIS program, dazzled the audience with his knowledge of one of the hottest trends in information technology: wearable devices.
  • Mark Blevis, Ottawa-based Digital Public Affairs Strategist, thrilled the audience with some amazing interactive media and demonstrated how books and libraries can immerse readers into a more engaging and participatory environment.
  • David Weigl, PhD candidate at SIS, carefully guided the audience through the intricacies of relevance in music search.
  • Guillermo Galdamez, a first-year student of McGill’s MLIS program and Knowledge Continuity Officer for MLISSA, talked about the challenges of maintaining and promoting SIS Wikis.
  • Michael Groenendyk, the newly hired business librarian for Concordia University Libraries, made some incredible revelations about the opportunities and challenges of 3D printing and 3D scanning.
  • Laurie Devine, Social Media Manager at McGill’s Media Relations Office, demonstrated some terrific features of her new social media tool, Flipboard, and compelled the audience to stay alert to emerging social media technologies.
  • David Lee King, Digital Services Director at Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library, flew to Montreal all the way from Kansas. He shared some of his invaluable experiences in social media marketing for libraries.
  • Edward Bilodeau, McGill’s Web Services Librarian, skilfully animated the round table discussion at the end of the day.

Web 2.U 2014-SpeakersAndSocialMediaVolunteers

Web 2.U 2014-Audience-1

Web 2.U 2014-AJWestGoogleGlass
Web 2.U 2014 Audience-2

Web 2.U 2014 - PaulGrewal-ChiefEventOrganizer

Web 2.U 2014-Volunteers

I would like to thank everyone who took an interest in Web 2.U 2014 and those who generously helped make it happen. If you have some ideas to share for next year’s conference, feel free to contact me: anastasia.prozorova@mail.mcgill.ca.

The Future of KM revealed at the International Conference on Knowledge Management (ICKM)

By Nathalie De Preux

On November 1-2, 2013, the 9th edition of the ICKM took place for the first time here in Montreal, chaired by SIS Director, Professor France Bouthillier. The conference, in which 37 papers were presented, focused on KM metrics, performance measurement, capacity building, and certification.

Why is ICKM special? You have probably come across ads about different conferences on “Knowledge Management in action”, or similar titles. Many of these KM conferences target private sector executives and host thousands of participants (not to mention the extravagant registration fees). ICKM, on the other hand, brings together a more collegial group of both researchers and practitioners in the KM field. These participants come from all around the world to discuss the latest studies and practical applications of KM. The smaller nature of this conference allows for deeper interaction and more opportunities to meet the speakers personally.

IMG_5384 IMG_5388

Key takeaways

  • We will witness an ever-stronger tie with big data, and initiatives to use data for decision-making purposes.
  • Collaboration, social networking, and Communities of Practice, in particular, will continue to play an important role as enablers of knowledge sharing.
  • Outcome metrics and systems will be key in measuring the impact of KM on an organization.
  • KM will be particularly important in niche markets such as healthcare, nuclear energy, and emergency management.
  • Synergies between KM and Intelligence Systems, as well as knowledge discovery techniques will continue to grow.

Practitioners of KM at Golder Associates and Infosys provided us with insights on their experience in putting KM initiatives in place in the private sector (e.g. linking people within the organization). They pointed out key factors that make a community successful, barriers that might impede these efforts, and offered practical recommendations to get real value out of expertise locator systems.

SIS’s new faculty member, Professor Max Evans, gave a presentation on trust as one of the major social cognitive factors that influence knowledge sharing. He also shared the findings of his research in a law firm on this particular topic.

Other key questions that were answered were:

How can iSchools capitalize on branding, and create products and services that truly position them as key players in the knowledge economy?

By collecting stories about how graduates have contributed to business.

What makes a library school an iSchool?

The variety of disciplines offered, the size of the faculty, the number of alumni, and the inclusion of faculty from different backgrounds, not only from Library Science.

The topic of Competitive Intelligence was also present at ICKM. Presentations included a study conducted in the public sector in South Africa, which showed the importance of CI as a process that is used to gather actionable information and predict the future. CI allows the public sector to better leverage its competing forces to improve the quality of its services as if it were a business with external competitors.

The above is just a brief summary of the variety of interesting topics presented at ICKM, and it gives you an idea of the richness of this unique conference. We look forward to next year’s ICKM edition in Paris and hope that SIS students will have the opportunity to participate!

List of topics discussed at the conference

  • –  Knowledge Management in Theory and Practice
  • –  Communication, Collaboration and Knowledge Sharing
  • –  KM Implementation and Strategy
  • –  Knowledge Management in the Public Sector
  • –  Knowledge Organization
  • –  Knowledge Management Tools
  • –  Knowledge Discovery
  • –  Project and Knowledge Management
  • –  Knowledge Metrics and Measurement
  • –  iSchools in the Context of the Knowledge Economy
  • –  Knowledge Management in Libraries
  • –  Competitive Intelligence
  • –  Access to Information and Knowledge
  • –  Knowledge Management and Healthcare
  • –  Intellectual Capital and Scientific Collaboration
Blog authors are solely responsible for the content of the blogs listed in the directory. Neither the content of these blogs, nor the links to other web sites, are screened, approved, reviewed or endorsed by McGill University. The text and other material on these blogs are the opinion of the specific author and are not statements of advice, opinion, or information of McGill.