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The Return of CAMBAM Student Seminars

Fall is in the air here at McGill, bringing with it crisp mornings, frisbee in the lower field and the CAMBAM student seminar! The seminar takes place bi-weekly in room 1120 of Burnside Hall from 4-5pm.

The schedule for Fall 2017 is:

Date/Speaker/Trivia

Sept 27/Amir pt. 1: Following Google themed trivia where Kyle won 2-0, Amir spoke to us about the longest common sequence (L.C.S) problem from the computer science and microbiology perspectives. After introducing the problem, Amir discussed the naive algorithm and dynamic programming principle for the L.C.S problem before leaving us on a cliffhanger waiting to see the application to mRNA transcription.

Oct 4/Amir pt. 2: Mahmoud won alternate search engine trivia. Amir continued his presentation of the alignment problem in bioinformatics, introduced the idea of deletion, insertion and copying mutations in DNA transcription/translation, and stated the Needlemann-Wunsch and Smith-Waterman theorems.

Oct 11/ Kyle/Yujing: Yujing asked a series of questions about the logisitic map, music and Saskatchewan. Kyle presented an age structured model of red blood cell production. There was a lively discussion about units, integrals and maturation.

Oct 18/Laurent/Matt: Laurent presented some of his work discretizing the Fokker-Planck equation in order to model how immune cells ingest nanoparticles.

Oct 25/Matt/Amir : Amir led off with global warming trivia and the dire state of the world. Matt spoke about a L1 minimization problem in genetics and Mahmoud presented his difference equation model for ant populations.

Nov 8/Tyler/Kyle: Kyle asked about plastic production, recycling and exponential growth of plastic in landfills. Tyler talked about exponential growth of monocytes in the bone marrow, what are white blood cells good for anyways and who cares?

Nov 22/ Yujing/ Matt: Yujing finished this semester’s CAMBAM seminar with a presentation about how object orientation can impact visual recognition.

There are still spots available for speakers, if any one would like to present their present research, a paper they have read or a question they have thought about! Seminars are run in chalk-talk format, although it is possible to use a projector.

Computational Neuroscience Workshop 2014 – Online and Timeless Material

Hello everyone!

From the feedback I had over the last two weeks and my own feelings, force is to conclude that this year again the workshop has been an exceptional occasion to acquire and share information on computational tools available to neuroscientists. (more…)

Computational Neuroscience Workshop – 2014

Flyer - Comp. Neur. 2014

Good day everyone!

Over the course of the last few months, a team of McGill neuroscience students and post-docs have been preparing talks on the topic of computational neuroscience aimed at explaining computational techniques that they are applying to their data, the results of which will be presented at the Computational Neuroscience Workshop 2014.

(more…)

Computational Neuroscience Workshop, Online!

Hi guys,

Finally! After several hours of video editing and cursing (ok, it wasn’t that bad), here are the videos of the talks presented during the computational neuroscience workshop, held on May 7th of this year. (more…)

“Computational Neuroscience Workshop” you said!?!

Yes!

Several members of the CAMBAM student community, and professors associated with it, are studying in the field of neuroscience, but CAMBAM only rarely sponsored neuroscience events. It is time for this to change! (more…)

“Empty Sets” art show@The Plant, 18 August, 2012

Ellwood Epps playing at Empty Sets, while a guest takes over an installation (bottom left and projection).

Ellwood Epps playing at Empty Sets, while a guest takes over an installation (bottom left and projection).

“Lennart, what do you think we do an art show with CAMBAM?”
“But Grace, we are scientists.”
“Some great art has been done by simple minds.”
Lennart, clearly out of arguments: “Ehhhm, I guess we do an art show then?!” (more…)

Area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve – A versatile tool, by Jackson Smith*

The method used in classic studies [1, 2] to quantify the discrimination sensitivity of middle temporal (MT) neurones in a two-alternative, forced-choice (2AFC) task has since become an important technique of behavioural neurophysiology. The key question is whether a neurone fired more spikes in one condition than in another. However, traditional parametric methods for answering this question place restrictive assumptions on the statistics of neural activity; for example, neurones do not always resemble a Poisson process [3].

(more…)

Mathematical Modeling in Your Bone

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Are you studying math or physics and would be interested to know some aspects of interdisciplinary research in math/physics and biology/physiology? Are you curious about the picture above? If you answered “yes” to either of the questions, read on!

(more…)

A Review of the 3rd CAMBAM Annual Meeting

Participants gathering together for the round table with Sensorica

Past Friday, June 8, 2012, it was time for the 3rd CAMBAM Annual Meeting. The past Annual Meetings both created a little bit of a magical atmosphere, befitting such a day that only happens once a year, and only once. Participants were invited to the McGill Faculty Club, its wooden interior speaking of prestige and privilege. Being served an excellent four course meal, I wondered if our contribution can justify such privilege, or in the end displaces little more air than the beat of a butterfly’s wing. After all, this day was primarily about scientific progress in CAMBAM, a day to rest and review our accomplishments and progress – which often takes the form of small steps, taken one at a time – so let’s focus not on dinner courses and ambiance, but on students’ and corporate guests’ contributions to a day full of progress made, interdisciplinary perspectives, and new connections.

(more…)

Commentary: 1 year CAMBAM student chapter – past, present, future.

We CAMBAM students always were lucky: part of a network of renegade mathematicians, engineers, physicists etc., with a keen interest in thrilling BioMedical applications. Situated inside Montreal’s universities and institutes, headed by acclaimed head researchers, our aptitude meets the necessary environment. We are in the best company possible, backed up by some of the arguably most potent resources out there.

Could we be proud? (more…)

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