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The Hunt for a Roommate

It’s apartment hunting season and with that comes the decision of where you’ll live and with who. If this is your first year, the thought of leaving the safety and comfort of a McGill residence may seem just a little daunting, albeit probably a little exciting too. For many, moving out of the room you shared with your first roommate also means getting ready to move in with a good friend. For others, it means the start of searching for someone to share a living space with. Here are 5 tips to tackle this search safely and efficiently:


Why Should I Budget?

There are various resources on campus that may have inspired you to budget: Scholarships & Student Aid Office, Frugal Scholars, and Rez Life amongst others. However, many McGill students do not budget vigorously (and some don’t budget at all).

I am guilty of not budgeting any of my expenses incurred during my time at McGill. One of my resolutions for the new year was to start budgeting so that I could control my cash flow and stop depleting my savings account. Initially, I did not see the point in budgeting because I had a part-time job, I was able to pay rent on time, and I had extra spending money for going out and shopping. But this was an unsustainable lifestyle because my balance at the end of the month was always a solid zero; I never saved up and I never invested my money effectively.


Multilingualism as an Asset

Bilinguals today make up approximately half of the world’s population. I, myself, grew up in a bilingual household and learned a third language when I began going to school. It is not surprising that in our highly globalized world, being fluent in more than one language is extremely beneficial. Asides from supposedly being better for your neurological health and making communication much easier, being proficient in several languages will often be a serious asset as you progress through your education and enter the workforce.


Science Jobs Away From Research

McGill is a research-intensive university. To be able to attend a school that places importance on research and study in the field, is a privilege. It offers countless opportunities to students and can be a rewarding and career-changing experience. It’s a pivotal part of your education, especially if you plan on going into academia. But… what if that’s not something you’re interested in? If after your studies, the lab bench or research team is not for you, or maybe you just want a break, here are other job paths in science that you may want to take. Note that some require additional education.


Why Am I Not Stressed?

I’ve learned a few things about time management, responsibility, and cramming for midterms in my three semesters at McGill. In my U0 year, I had a very different outtake on balancing academics and social activities; I often prioritized the wrong thing and made poor decisions, leaving assignments and homework to the last minute. I wasn’t super involved on campus and I was only taking four courses per semester, so I blamed myself for not staying on track.

However, it took me an entire year to realize that my stress levels had little to do with how much I needed to accomplish. Instead, it had a lot to do with self-care, a healthy lifestyle, and effective studying habits. Today, I am more active within my faculty and I am effectively juggling a heavy course load along with part-time jobs and social commitments. This is what I’m doing to say goodbye to stress: (more…)

Unconventional Study Hubs

With midterm season approaching, you might be cracking down on those books. You’ve heard of Schulich, McLennan, Redpath, the typical locations… if you’re looking for innovative (or simply less crowded) areas to study, feel free to check out my list of favourites!

  1. Trottier Building, 3rd and 4th floors. Lots of room and really fast internet. You’ll be able to find a space here even during exam season; unfortunately, you’ll have to ask an eng or compsci friend to let you in after hours or on the weekend. You can also try to sneak snacks from the ECSESS/CSUS lounge or buy coffee at Paramount!      (more…)

Regrets and Moving Forward

“Life is too short to live with regrets.” I’m sure I’m not the first one to have heard too many motivational quotes on living without regret. Unfortunately, it’s just something that we all feel and experience – bad choices, missed opportunities, unfortunate decisions, uncomfortable situations, time dedicated to things that weren’t worth it and to people who didn’t stay. In a time of our lives where much is focused on the studying we do daily and the career we strive to someday have, regrets happen during the undergraduate journey too.


Remember the brave girl trudging in the flood – Use digital gadgets wisely for your study

Copyright to original resourcesJust on Jan 28 a few years ago (2013 to be precise), a Youtube video filming a girl trying to go against the flood on McTavish Street went viral, and I remembered that although I was not on site, the flood coming from a pierced main pipe connecting to the reservoir really caused tons of trouble and turned all lower campus to swamp. The girl struggled for a few minutes and decided just to go with the flow, which is actually a brave move in front of all the people staring at her. (more…)

Cafés: the Newest Study Spaces

For me personally, the perfect study space is in the comfort of my own room, where I’m free to follow my own routine and get up whenever needed without having to worry about leaving my things out on the table, all while not getting distracted by others passing by or loud conversations. I know for many of my friends, however, that it is quite the contrary for them. Unable to stay focused at home, other settings give them the motivation to study and keep on track. Once you’re in your final year, you know what works best for you, but in the meantime, there are plenty of spaces to go to if you’re in need of a change in environment while you review your notes for that upcoming midterm.


Why does POWE Matter?

Organizations like Promoting Opportunities for Women in Engineering (POWE) have existed for a while now. McWiCs, MWNG, MWiL, and others also come to mind when one thinks about female groups on campus. While these organisations have different mandates and cater to varying populations of students, they share the strive for female empowerment.

Let’s take a closer look at POWE today and understand why it’s such an important organization for all genders. POWE is a “philanthropic group at McGill University under Engineering Undergraduate Society (EUS) that helps, discovers, moulds, supports and promotes every girl who nestled the ambition to adorn an iron ring”. POWE focuses on both female engineering students at McGill and future female engineers as young as primary school girls.


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