The Homestretch

Spring is finally starting to make its first appearances after long months of very cold Montreal weather (although apparently, and unfortunately for those like me who are excited about warmer weather, we should expect more cold temperatures and snow heading into April). With that, means, approaching final exams (and long hours at the library), and the impending end of yet another semester. Summer vacation is so close, yet so far, as so many things need to get done before you can start that summer job or take a break from the hectic student life. With only a few weeks left before the start of final exams, here are some of what should be ticked off your checklist in the homestretch:

Register for your fall courses

This is vital to getting the courses you’d like next semester! Returning students register between April 4-6, with the first day of registration being reserved for upcoming U3 students, and the last for those entering U1. Some departments have exceptions to this, however. Be sure to check under Student Menu on Minerva to see your personalized registration start time, which varies depending on how many credits you have left to graduate. Prepare your registration in advance by talking to advisors and using the Visual Schedule Builder.

Talk to your professors about class material

Exams are just around the corner, so it is a good idea to see your professors and TA’s to go over class material that you aren’t confident about. As intimidating as it may appear, especially if you aren’t used to talking to them, it is essential to do before office hours become very busy. It will give you extra time to study and ensure you are comfortable with the content of the course. Additionally, make sure to attend conferences and tutorials, which will likely review important topics in the last couple of weeks before exams.

Eat well, sleep well, exercise

Exam season also equals time of stress and unhealthy routines, like pulling all-nighters and staying up on energy drinks. Many students just want to lengthen their studying time, but it comes at a cost. Eating at regular hours and healthily, sleeping at a reasonable time and for uninterrupted periods, and exercising consistently will contribute to, not only reducing stress levels, but making your studying more efficient. Although you probably hear this advice all year long, now more than ever would be a good time to follow it.

Spring cleaning & preparing to move out

For first year students living in on-campus residents, you will need to begin preparing for moving out. The move-out process is generally similar for all students regardless of which rez you are staying at and includes: cleaning your room, ensuring everything is left the way it was when you arrived, room inspections, arranging for storage if needed, and finally returning keys and cards at the very end. Other students whose lease may be ending, who are moving into another place for the summer, or subletting to someone else will need to follow a similar process.

Making summer plans

With four months between the winter and fall term, you are left with plenty of time to make the most out of your summer. While most students staying to take summer courses already have an idea of what the start of their summer will look like, some may not know at all! This could mean internships, jobs, and volunteering, but also time to travel with friends and relax at home with family to recharge and recuperate after a tiring, stressful semester.

Study hard, reach out, take care of yourself, and try your best. This a busy time of the year for everyone, but you will be out for summer vacation soon enough!

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