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Dealing with stress and cold weather – final survival guide

It is mid-November and some of us still have their second mid-terms of this semester. Now it’s getting dark before 5 pm, and we wrap ourselves like tortilla. Since our semester is only less than 4 months long, the finals are actually around the corner.

Undegrads usually have 4 to 5 courses per semester, and we are drowning in deadlines throughout the semester. It seems that we don’t have a lot of time to prepare for the finals, so I want to share with everyone how I managed to obtain decent grades for 6 courses in one semester. (more…)

Mental Health Support for Students on Tight Schedules

Thinkladder app mental health student career blog quote insight

Source: Thinkladder.com

Has this happened to you? You know you already have too much on your plate, and you are eager to make the most of every opportunity. In one way or another, you end up setting goals and standards that are beyond your current means. Okay, maybe you can accomplish everything if you take out the time required for sleeping and eating. And being at a competitive university doesn’t help the struggle.

I am like you.

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Why is it so hard to just “do what you want?”

quote thought bubble saying what do you want to be when you grow up mcgill career blogWhat do you want to do? That’s a loaded question.

I remember asking this question during a speed dating study. First, he says “well, I don’t know.” Then he shares a bit about what he’s studying. Eventually, if he feels safe enough, he might share a dream of his. He thinks it’s not practical. I listen as he convinces himself to be interested in something more mainstream and secure. Maybe you’ve had a similar conversation with someone, or with yourself — knowing what you want, but not sure if it’s the ‘right’ thing to pursue

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Your CV: the first window

Michael Zwahlen / EyeEm / Getty Images

No matter what you are applying for, jobs, volunteers, grad schools, scholarships, etc., usually you are asked to provide the recruiters/committee members with an up-to-date CV. If you are not a professor with hundreds of publications, you usually limit your CV to a few pages maximum. No just the page limit, it is essential to present a version of you that you want people to see and to acknowledge. Here, I would like to share with you my CV-writing trudge since my first year of university. (more…)

Skills to Develop Today, So You Can Use Them Tomorrow

University teaches you an immense amount of invaluable information. Most of us go into it thinking we will learn everything there is to know about our degree, so that we can apply the new knowledge and know how to get the job done, and get it done well. But the truth is, your classes provide much more than just the information you will need, as important as that is. You also develop a wide variety of skills that, as you continue your education and enter the workforce, will serve you well, and provide you with a basis for so many of the things you will do later in life.

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Grad School – a new start?

Copyright: PhD Comics

For grad school applicants, some deadlines are approaching, especially for those who want to get scholarships/fellowships. I remember that two years ago, I was in the same shoes asking these philosophical questions: where to go, what to learn, why to apply?

Before I start my story, here is the CaPS page for grad school application: http://www.mcgill.ca/caps/students/gradschool. (more…)

What I Wish I’d Done During Recruitment Season

From pre-recruitment events and firm tours to end-of-recruitment cocktails, the accounting recruitment season passes by fast. But through the stress, excitement, and all of the waiting, you might be lucky enough to get a call from your favourite firm. Looking back, here’s what I would have done differently.  (more…)

From First Year to Second Year

So I’m a third year student. Now I was never really fond of math, but I believe that means I’ve been through two years of university. Looking back, there were many differences between my first year and second year. Some of those differences were actual changes of something that I did in first year. Not all of these were good things, but they did help me learn a lot about how to survive a year’s worth of university (technically it’s only 8 months, but it feels longer). Hopefully they can prove useful to you! (more…)

7 More Tips to Succeed in Your First Year

As a first-year student, you get a lot of advice on how to manage the start of this new chapter of your life. From student handbooks to online resources, many places offer tips and tricks that you can carry on with you throughout your studies and later in life. Things like ‘don’t procrastinate’, ‘eat well’, and ‘get involved on campus’ often make up part of the list of things you can do to both enjoy your university years and be successful, but there’s more!

Here are seven more ways to do well during your first year (and beyond!):

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Involved, Not Involved, and “Too Involved”

The start of a new semester is always filled with excitement, nerves, add-drop season, and the dramatic shift from perpetual procrastination to keeping up with classes. For returning students, it’s an opportunity to see friends we haven’t connected with for a while. For new students, it’s the beginning of new friendships and connections at the university. For new and old alike, it’s a period of time where we join new clubs and organizations, both on-campus and within the Montréal community!

When I started my first year at McGill, I was hesitant to join student societies and other groups because hanging out with strangers was terrifying. I wanted to concentrate on my studies, meet people living in my residence, and save enough time to Netflix daily.  (more…)

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