Bonjour-Hi, Bye-Bye?

Last year, Québec lawmakers passed a unanimous motion that called on businesses to replace the renowned “Bonjour-hi” with a simple “Bonjour.” While this does not seem to garner any importance, the social circumstances of Montréal’s multiculturalism are at risk. This motion signifies the hard-pressed tactics used by political parties such as the Parti Québécois (PQ) to preserve the French language. Imposing language restrictions in the workplace reflects the rigidity of certain individuals and the antagonism harboured by these peoples towards anglophone communities.

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Multilingualism as an Asset

Bilinguals today make up approximately half of the world’s population. I, myself, grew up in a bilingual household and learned a third language when I began going to school. It is not surprising that in our highly globalized world, being fluent in more than one language is extremely beneficial. Asides from supposedly being better for your neurological health and making communication much easier, being proficient in several languages will often be a serious asset as you progress through your education and enter the workforce.

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