The Trouble With Loving Too Many Things – How to Be Less Distracted

I can be easily distracted. There’s easily half-a-dozen different lives and lifestyles that I can imagine for myself, and I could be happy with any of these paths. From dreams of being a traveling nomad, to desires of becoming articulate in movement through dance, to thoughts about continuing my studies in earth science, and even new pursuits of counseling psychology – these broad and varied interests all have a life of their own. I often find myself torn between the need to explore more into each of these interests and convincing myself to take my time, while at the same time, feeling restless about not being able to commit.

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What I Wish I Knew When I was a Freshman

GradSchool2So tomorrow I’m doing a retreat for Service Point, the administrative office at McGill. They invited me to come and give suggestions about what could be improved in their office. Service Point is the face of McGill. It’s where students go to first when they arrive here. And, even though it has nothing to do with student affairs and personal problems, most people end up going there because it’s the only place that they can think of reaching out to. Therefore, this blog post is me outlining a little bit of what I wish I had known when I entered McGill.

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Summers: you only have a few of them before life begins

After some overtly excited planning for a EuroTrip with my friend this summer, my family put the cap on me. I told my aunt about our awesome plans of traveling all around Europe  and all the places we wanted to see. But my aunt just told me “you only have 4 summers before applying to grad school. Summer is the only time where you don’t have school work and you can dedicate all of your time to building on your hands-on skills”.

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Pursuit: Applying product development strategies to your life

Divya Pahwa writes about young-lady career advice in the weekly series Pursuit, here on the McGill Caps Blog.

Gary S. Lynn and Richar R. Reilly published Blockbusters: The Five Keys to Developing Great New Products highlighting their findings of successful new products in 2003.

These are their ‘five keys’:
(1) Commitment not contribution of senior management
(2) Clear and stable vision
(3) Improvisation
(4) Information exchange
(5) Collaboration under pressure

Teams that developed blockbuster products excelled at each of these.

After I read their book, I kept trying to rationalize how to apply them in life – you know to create Blockbuster versions of ourselves? (I know exactly how cheesy that sounds, bear with me). There has to be secret lady advice hidden within these elements! This is what I came up with….

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