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How to Handle Rejection – Lessons from Distributing Flyers

Have you ever wondered what it’s like to work as a flyer distributor or a fundraising canvasser? I know that most often than not, my first reaction when I see a canvasser is to avoid them. For these workers, rejection is a daily reality inherent to their work, and finding a healthy way to manage rejection also becomes crucial to their work and their well-being. For the rest of us. rejection is a fact of life that we will all face at one point or another, in life or in work. The past two weekends, I worked as a flyer distributor on a busy downtown street. I’d like to share my experiences with a focus on how it has helped me find a more balanced and healthy perspective on rejection.

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How to Negotiate a Job Offer – Workshop Overview

Life is full of negotiations and compromises. However, when we think about negotiating a job offer, the stereotypes of greedy, bossy and uncommitted people quickly surface. Many people fear that negotiating a job offer will lead to tension in the workplace, or even cause them to lose an offer*. Consequently, many people shy away from negotiating and from asking for a better work experience for themselves. To help us navigate the complexities of negotiating a job offer, McGill’s Career Planning Services (CaPS) hosted a workshop called “Negotiating Your Academic Job Offer” on March 30th, presented by Dr. Niem Huynh, as part of the Academic Career Week. Here, I summarize the main strategies for negotiating a job offer.

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Let’s Talk: Don’t Suffer the Agony of Job Searching Alone

I have spent the last two months attending counseling on resumes, cover letters and interviews; applying for jobs online, and meeting with employers. I have heard sayings such as “when you don’t have a job, it is your full-time job to search for one,” and “it’s not what you know, it’s who you know.” I figured, it can’t be that difficult, you just put in the time and, like school, you apply where you want, they realize your merit and bam! you’ve got a dream job that you’re passionate about and pays really well… How naïve of me. I have agonised over cover letters and resumes, with each application requiring 5 hours of grueling preparation. I have been faced with rejection time after time, and all of it has had a mental toll on me. Coming out of McGill, I have hardly had to prove my merits because they were there clearly posted on my transcript. I had rarely been rejected for research or VP positions that I had wanted. Now, I am stewing in self-doubt, doubting my credentials and my ability to work, and I am unsure of what kind of work I want to do. In order to snap out of it, I have found that the greatest way to get my spirits up is to relate to others. Here are 3 groups of people that are helping me piece out this time in my life.

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What I learned from being turned down after interview

So I attended an interview for a medical scribe position and was turned down a few weeks back. I would like to share some information on this exciting job, why I was turned down, and how I used what I learned to succeed in something else. (more…)

Being Open to Career Changes

Screen-Shot-2015-04-07-at-1.07.33-PMWhen I first came to McGill, I had a pretty clear idea of what I wanted to do. When you come to a university that is as prestigious as ours, there is a good amount of pressure on knowing what you want to do right away in order to be the most competitive candidate as soon as possible. The thing is, I don’t think anyone is truly prepared for college until they’re thrown into it. Everything that you plan is always incredibly susceptible to change. What is in your power is your receptivity to those changes.

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Managing Rejection

REJECTIONI don’t know about everyone else, but I’m the type of person who fears rejection. So much so that I used to avoid applying for positions, jobs or even scholarships I was interested in. For whatever reason, I was convinced I wouldn’t get them and that I was better off saving myself the misfortune of rejection. I soon realized that this wasn’t a healthy mentality to maintain and that I wasn’t doing myself any favours.

If you’re like me and the thought of potentially being rejected gives you hives, I’ve got some news for you: you have absolutely nothing to lose from trying. Even if you don’t get the job or the scholarship, at the very least, you’ll come out of the process with more experience. As cliché as it sounds, what you learn from unsuccessful attempts will only help strengthen your applications in the future.

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The Catch-22

catch22-finaledit-1The original Catch-22 came from Joseph Heller’s novel Catch-22. A squadron of airmen were assigned a dangerous mission and the only way out is to declare your own insanity and therefore be unfit for the mission. Catch-22 was a rule that stated any airmen fearing a dangerous mission is being rational and therefore not insane. This paradox left the squadron with no choice but continue on to a journal they know they might not return.

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Dog Days of Summer

It’s hard to believe that only a little more than a week ago, I was slaving over my notes, studying and cramming like every other student preparing for their final exams.

I am so glad those few weeks are finally over. Fast forward (more…)

Don’t be Discouraged – Take Every Setback as a Learning Opportunity

setback

After working full time with the same employer for over five years, I felt the impact of austerity in the educational domain this year when for the first time in my career, my contract shrivelled from 100% to 50%. Contract work is not easy due to its unpredictability and inconsistency and evidently, permanency and job stability are what most people in the workforce strive for in the long run. We will all face various setbacks in our personal lives, education and work lives, but I cannot stress enough the importance of learning to take away something positive from these challenges and use them to your advantage instead. I will explain how through my own journey, I learned to look at setbacks as a learning opportunity instead of an obstacle.

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Dare To Compare – or Should we Steer Clear?

 

apples&oranges

As the first month of university courses has come to end, by this point we have all earned some “constructive criticism” from our professors, peers and employers. This is the time of year when everything seems so fresh and these are the precious moments when we try to build our foundation and reputation in order to start the school year off right. However, as the season changes, so do many of our moods. You may have heard these phrases blurted on several occasions during this time of year: “Why did he/she get the job instead of me?” “Why did he/she receive a grant instead of me?” “Why did he/she receive a higher grade?” “It’s not fair!” (more…)

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