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Skills to Develop Today, So You Can Use Them Tomorrow

University teaches you an immense amount of invaluable information. Most of us go into it thinking we will learn everything there is to know about our degree, so that we can apply the new knowledge and know how to get the job done, and get it done well. But the truth is, your classes provide much more than just the information you will need, as important as that is. You also develop a wide variety of skills that, as you continue your education and enter the workforce, will serve you well, and provide you with a basis for so many of the things you will do later in life.

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Transferring Faculties… and Changing Your Life!

I always thought I knew what I wanted to study in university and what career path I wanted to follow after my studies. BSc in Neuroscience or BA/Sc in Cognitive Science, followed by med school and a promise of steady income for the next 50 years. I dedicated my time to researching the smallest details, even reclaiming my Québec residency to increase my chances of acceptance into medical school.

After one year at McGill, everything changed for me. I realized that I could not follow a curriculum filled with rote memorization and that I had a surprising knack for mathematics. For women in STEM, it’s not abnormal to receive little or no support from teachers and other members of authority when we show interest in maths and sciences.  (more…)

To the First Year’s Who Aren’t Sure They Made the Right Decision

It’s been almost a month since classes started, summer has come to an end and the mid-term period is upon us. As a first year student, this was about the time of the term where I started to ask myself questions: Did I take the right courses for my degree? Will I enjoy them? Will I do well in them? What if this is not what I want to do at all? While some students know exactly what classes they want to be in and what career path they want to take, for many others, it is not as clear cut.

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7 More Tips to Succeed in Your First Year

As a first-year student, you get a lot of advice on how to manage the start of this new chapter of your life. From student handbooks to online resources, many places offer tips and tricks that you can carry on with you throughout your studies and later in life. Things like ‘don’t procrastinate’, ‘eat well’, and ‘get involved on campus’ often make up part of the list of things you can do to both enjoy your university years and be successful, but there’s more!

Here are seven more ways to do well during your first year (and beyond!):

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A Resource Kit for New and Returning Students

Another school year has begun! The skirt and shorts season is coming to a close, switched for the coats and course packs of another knowledge-packed semester.

As a recent graduate, walking by the downtown campus, captivated by its newfound novelty, reminded me of my first impressions of McGill.

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My $0.02 Worth to an Incoming Student

Hello new McGill student that has stumbled upon this blog! First and foremost, I want to say congratulations on your acceptance to McGill – I hope you find everything and more that you’re looking for from a university experience at McGill. I know that you’re probably being bombarded with e-mails about orientation sessions and all the glorious events that are coming up. Or you could be a not-typical-first-year-student; maybe you’re on exchange, or just testing the waters for a year, or a third-year student that just switched into McGill. Whatever the case, I’m sure the process of coming to McGill is quite heavy. From planning courses to planning housing to planning food, there’s a lot to think about. But there might also be some general things that you’ll want to know. Here are some things I wish I was more familiar with when I first joined the McGill environment:   (more…)

Taking a Summer Class in Montreal

Although the thought of summer break approaching can be the only thing carrying you through winter finals, taking a summer class in Montreal can be a great experience. With its own benefits and drawbacks, taking a class in the summer can be a widely different experience from regular scheduled classes. Here’s what I took away from my first summer class at McGill.

 

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Competition and Our View of Success – Exploring the Effects of Social Darwinism

I studied earth system science in my undergraduate. It’s a small program in which we learn about how the earth behaves as one single system. Learning about the earth has many perks, such as traveling to different places around the world with the excuse of studying diverse landscapes and ecosystems. (more…)

Do We Categorize to Live, or Live to Categorize?

As a society, and as a world, we put people into boxes. We categorize them. It’s easier than putting people on a spectrum. It’s accessible and fast to categorize; so accessible, in fact, that we go overboard. We jam-pack individuals and divide them. For example, the “bigger” people go here, the “smaller” go there; the “beautiful” go here, the “ugly” go there; the “happy” go here and the “depressed” go there. We divide one another, simply by categorizing ourselves. It’s easy, it’s fast… but also ineffective.

Grades Matter, but Experience Matters More

Why does it seem that being successful at school means employers will be lining up at our doors to hire us when we graduate? It’s not true! If we have no job experience, we are at the bottom of the hiring pool behind candidates who have already been part of the work force for several years. Retrospectively, if I had worked hard at finding unpaid or even paid experience in my field, instead of just focusing on excelling in the classroom during my studies, I feel as if I would have been better equipped for the job search now. (more…)

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