Notes from the AIDS2016 Conference in Durban, South Africa

Kara Leigh Redden

In July, I had the amazing opportunity to not only participate in the AIDS2016 International AIDS Conference in Durban, South Africa, but to also present my research on the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV with my Haitian co-investigator.

Kara and her co-investigator presenting their work at the AIDS2016 conference in Durban, South Africa.

Kara and her co-investigator presenting their work at the AIDS2016 conference in Durban, South Africa.

It was our first time in South Africa and our first time at such an internationally organized event focused on HIV/AIDS. The weeklong conference was jam packed with activities, events, speaker series, presentations and much more—so much more that it was impossible to fit everything in the five days we were there.

Among the many leaders speaking, we heard from Charlize Theron on the importance of recognizing HIV/AIDS as a human rights issue.

Actress Charlize Theron speaking on human rights issues surrounding HIV/AIDS.

Actress Charlize Theron speaking on human rights issues surrounding HIV/AIDS.

We also heard from Elton John and Prince Harry remarking on the importance of recognizing youth’s voices and vulnerability in efforts to end the burden of HIV/AIDS.

Sir Elton John speaking at the AIDS2016 conference.

Sir Elton John speaking on youth vulnerability at the AIDS2016 conference.

Most impressive was the participation of some of the most vulnerable groups affected by HIV—healthcare workers, trans-men and -women, sex workers, homeless populations, and members of aboriginal communities as well as the lesbian and gay community. While we still have a long way to go to ensure that the voices of these groups are represented, it was refreshing to be among those who are the most affected by HIV and the barriers that affect access to HIV care and services.  Because of this, we were graced by many leading HIV/AIDS activists who have spent their life standing up to big corporations and governments to make sure that those who need care the most can get access to that care.

Any trip to South Africa would not have been complete without paying homage to the great Nelson Mandela. We visited Mandela’s capture site where a monument was erected in his honour, constructed out of the very bars that held him captive for over 27 years.  I hope that he would have been proud of the great work being done in his country.

The monument marking Nelson Mandela's capture site in the South African province of KwaZulu-Natal.

The monument commemorating Nelson Mandela’s capture site in the South African province of KwaZulu-Natal.

Kara graduated in May 2016 with a Masters of Nursing and a concentration in Global Health Studies. During her studies, she travelled to Haiti to conduct research on the prevention of mother-to-child transmission in collaboration with their partner site, Zanmi Lasante. Kara has been involved in various Global Health activities since 2012 and hopes to continue to contribute to this field as a nurse.

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