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“To be or not to be?”: An intern

It’s September. It’s potentially the beginning of my last year as a graduate student. Except if I decide to do a PhD at some point. So far so good though, I should be finishing grad school some time next Spring/Summer.

My first article was about my dream job which I finally decided to quit. This was a hard decision, but I did it to solve my rhythm problem. No more long-term academic projects combined with short-term rushes on social media.

The question being, what should I do next? I know myself. There is no way I will feel fulfilled with “just” writing a 100 page dissertation. No matter how passionate I am about my project, I need another challenge. Something new, something exciting, something that fits well with research and writing.

@GradLifeMcGill

How about an internship?

The main advantage – and disadvantage – of an internship is not being paid. You all get how this is a disadvantage. However, on the plus side, it also means more freedom to try things. As a volunteer, there is a good chance that your schedule will be flexible enough to allow you to take the time you need for your studies. It also means that you can try everything you’ve always dreamt of doing. It would be for a semester, for two days per week.

I’m not saying that everyone can afford an unpaid job, but I really think that it is a great option to try something new and to challenge yourself. You can always combine it with a part-time job. This way you will get all the advantages and can learn twice as much.

Last but not least, a two-day internship will not only fit well into my writing schedule, but it will help me balance it. If I have to use my morning alarm twice a week to go to work, I’ll probably end up waking up more easily the rest of the week to write. I decided to structure my week in two parts, two days at my new internship and two days of full writing. Leaving out: well, weekends because I would love to maintain some kind of social life, and my one day a week to think.

In my next article, I will discuss the importance of what I call “Thinking days”, not just writing.

Taking Down Time: Tiny Escapes

Being a grad student, being any student for that matter, or just being alive usually means there’s a lot going on and a lot on your mind. There are a myriad of ways to take your mind off things for a little while, but personally I love to read. To me reading takes me away to be someone else who’s somewhere else, for as long as I want to be there. Then at any time you may return there just by getting lost in a thought. I would like to do my part to help you get there. (more…)

The roller-coaster that is graduate school

"Graph - Work Output" "Piled Higher and Deeper" by Jorge Cham www.phdcomics.com

“Graph – Work Output”
“Piled Higher and Deeper” by Jorge Cham
www.phdcomics.com

Welcome to grad school, where schedules are made up and plans don’t matter.

(Alright, that’s not entirely true, but you’ll see what I mean soon enough).

Last week, I had a fairly productive week in the lab. To me, a “fairly productive” week means that I met with my supervisor, and crossed most items off my to-do list. I’m making good progress, and I’m on track to submit my thesis on time. I’m lucky to currently be in a spot in my master’s degree where I am typically making constant headway – but that’s not always the case.

(more…)

Tous à bord! Un stage à l’étranger en famille

Instagram / @gradlifemcgill by @digitalpigeons

Instagram / @gradlifemcgill by @digitalpigeons

En 2012, mon conjoint et mois nous nous sommes envolés à Paris pour faire un stage. Nous habitions un micro appartement mal isolé au 6e étage sans ascenseur. Notre nourriture comportait trop de pain et de fromage. Nous visitions sans contraintes les fins de semaine.

En 2015, mon conjoint a été invité à poursuivre son stage pendant quelques mois. Je voulais en profiter pour faire quelques recherches dans les archives de Paris. Le seul changement: un petit F-A d’un an qu’il fallait emmener. Après un moment de réflexion, nous avons entrepris les démarches pour déménager en famille. Ouf!

La planification a été plus difficile. Il a fallu trouver une éducatrice (à distance!) pour notre bébé puisque mon conjoint et moi devions étudier en journée. Nous avons réussi à louer un petit deux et demi situé dans un premier étage pas trop loin de la BNF. Grâce à des amis et au propriétaire de notre logement, F-A a eu des fournitures d’enfant. Même faire la valise du petit (va-t-il grandir beaucoup? quelle température fait-il à Paris l’hiver?) a été un casse-tête.

(more…)

“To be or not to be?”: Time and Graduate Life

The two sides of our time...photo by GradLife McGill Instagrammer @falisha.k

The two sides of our time…photo by GradLife McGill Instagrammer @falisha.k

Full name: Graduate Student. When your name is Graduate and your surname Student, you come to realize how the word time gets more and more often into your conversations. It’s always a matter of time: the time you are supposed to spend sleeping, the time for eating and feeding yourself up (yes, it does exist!), the time you would like to invest in hobbies or working out, the time to wake up, the time to love, the time to submit a paper, to get out from the library, to study, to read, to teach, to cheer, to…what?  Although you may find as many ways to talk about your graduate time as David Foster Wallace would do (and have a look at Infinite Jest’s footnotes to have an idea), there is one time that would never disappear, that is the time that we lack, the time that we may need to do all the things that we want to do.

(more…)

First year on campus… But not frosh

Parc La Fontaine. Photo by GradLife McGill Instagrammer @aleksbud.

Parc La Fontaine. Photo by GradLife McGill Instagrammer @aleksbud.

Well, September is almost upon us, bringing the start of a new school year. Seeing all of the incoming graduate students arrive in their labs allowed me to reflect upon my own experience of starting grad school one year ago. I came to realize that one aspect I’m happiest about is the fact that I decided to change universities to complete my graduate degree. Starting grad school at McGill was a lot like starting undergrad – except that I was a first year student in a different way. Here are some of the reasons that I’m glad I changed it up by starting grad school at a new university, and what I recommend for new students who are in the same boat this year.

My Advice:

Firstly: Explore Your Surroundings

Moving to a new university for grad school meant I was able to experience a new city. I had already become very familiar with my undergraduate university town, and the change of scenery was refreshing. In a city as large as Montreal, there are endless activities at our disposal; new streets to explore, and new adventures to be embarked upon. One way that I was able to fully take advantage of my new surroundings was to bring my favourite hobbies with me and enjoy them in my new environment. I found new running spots (Mount Royal, Parc Lafontaine, and Lachine Canal are some of my favourites), and different places where I can take interesting photos.

What I recommend to incoming students:  If you’re moving cities to begin grad school, take advantage of every opportunity provided by your new location! Do your best to see how your favourite activities, whatever they may be (reading, art, sports, etc), can be maximized and built upon here, or find a new hobby that is unique to the city (e.g. learning a new language).

(more…)

Happy Un-New Year!

Humpty_Dumpty_Tenniel

If you know your Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass, you would be familiar with an un-Birthday. As explained by Humpty Dumpty: “There are three hundred and sixty-four days when you might get un-birthday presents… and only one for birthday presents, you know.” (Carroll, 2009). So, an extension of the concept is that any significant day could be celebrated any time – 364 days of the year (minus one of course, because that is the actual day).

Personally, I think September is a better time to celebrate New Year’s Day. Specifically, the day following Labour Day. This year, September 6th. Why? Because everything is ahead, untouched. New classes, new deadlines, new friends to discover. All is possible, ready to be revealed, and free to the imagination. As well, it is really the only time that I find myself setting goals and resolutions. I am back planning now so I can be where I need to be by the end of May 2017. Summer is over, and the time has come to face new challenges. For students, the day following Labour Day is the real fresh start of a new year. The dog days of summer (a summer period marked by lethargy, inactivity, or indolence) are in the past, the seasons are changing, as are daily routines and schedules. So let’s get on with it! What goals and resolutions are you setting as we transition through the Un-New Year?

HAPPY UN-NEW YEAR to all new and returning graduate students. Hope your summer was restful and invigorating. Now is the time to set some goals, and go for it. All the best in the new year. Cheers and good luck.

Carroll, L., Haughton, H., & Carroll, L. (2009). Alice’s adventures in Wonderland ; and, Through the looking-glass and What Alice found there. New York: Penguin Classics.
Photo: Creative Commons Through the Looking-Glass, illustration by John Tenniel. Source:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Humpty_Dumpty_Tenniel.jpg

What Made You Go To Grad School ?

What made you go to grad school

September is just around the corner and that can only mean one thing: the start of a new school year. So welcome back to the ‘ever-so rested’ returning grads and a huge warm welcome to new McGill graduate students!

To celebrate, or not, depending on how you feel about the dreaded ‘rentrée des classes’, here is a video asking a couple of graduate students why they decided to go to grad school. I think most of you will relate but feel free to leave a comment down below saying what made YOU go to grad school. Would love to hear from you!

I wish everyone a smooth start and check out Alek’sMarion’s, Fannie’s previous posts for tips and tricks on how to overcome some of the challenges faced during grad school. You’re in for a treat.

Good luck and I hope you get sorted into your dream house ( I’m praying for Gryffindor!).

Ps: If you want to meet us in person ( how cool!!) come and see us at the PGSS BBQ Bash on September 7th- you don’t want to miss it.

Insomnia

Photo:  H McPherson

Photo: H McPherson

Insomnia defined: a sleep disorder that is characterized by difficulty falling and/or staying asleep. Hmmm, well, here we go again. Another beautiful Montreal night. Hot, crickets chirping, streetlights on, and so quiet. Beautifully quiet. 4:00 and Montreal is another world. Likely you have experienced this as well. So what is the problem? I am not stressed out; I’ve relaxed all summer. No assignments, no readings. I have spent the better part of the summer reading and puttering, as planned. But I go to bed and BAM, this theory or that lens pops into my head and there it stays.

Psychology Today (2012) noted that grad school “for many students it is the most energetically demanding time of their lives, not just for the hours put in, but the cognitive resources required to think critically and absorb complex material”. And yes, that’s right. The end result of all this complex and critical thinking is insomnia. How annoying. Sleep is required to carry on with all this complex thinking, but this complex thinking is killing sleep. So, I looked it up to see what can be done. Here is the advice:

Good sleep habits, also called sleep hygiene, can help you get a good night’s sleep and beat insomnia. Here are some tips:

¥ Go to sleep at the same time each night and get up at the same time each morning. Don’t take naps because naps may make you less sleepy at night.
¥ Avoid caffeine, nicotine, and alcohol late in the day. Caffeine and nicotine are stimulants and can keep you from falling asleep. Alcohol can cause waking in the night and interferes with sleep quality.
¥ Get regular exercise, but not 3-4 hours before bedtime, because it may stimulate you and make it hard to fall asleep.
¥ Don’t eat a heavy meal late in the day. A light snack before bedtime, however, may help you sleep.
¥ Make your bedroom comfortable: dark, quiet, and not too warm or too cold.
¥ Follow a routine to help you relax before sleep. Read a book, listen to music, or take a bath.
¥ If you can’t fall asleep and don’t feel drowsy, get up and read or do something that is not overly stimulating until you feel sleepy, but avoid screens. (Webmb.com)

A final note: personally, none of the above advice works!!! But all of your grad student insomniacs – enjoy your studies. 4:00 really is a glorious time to be awake.

Work cited:
Searles, R. (2012). Sleep and grad school: how important is it for students? Psychology Today. https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-stone-age-mind/201209/sleep-and-grad-school-how-important-is-it-students

http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/guide/insomnia-symptoms-and-causes?utm_source=health.mazavr.tk&utm_medium=link&utm_compaign=article#1

Time out! A year outside gradlife

Instagram / @gradlifemcgill by @na0mirlima

Instagram / @gradlifemcgill by @na0mirlima

The second year of my master, I didn’t really know what to do next. Job? PhD? Travelling in the vast world? Sleeping a whole year? I was clearly tired of studying day and night but afraid to go outside in the real world.

I wrote to a teacher I had in cegep and asked for his advice. He told me to take a break from university. So I didn’t apply to become a PhD.

At the end of my master in French Literature, I became an intern in communication and then I apply to work in Paris with LOJIQ in a small startup where I ended to do marketing/social media/communications. After a lot of work and some good bottles of wine, I came back to the first company I worked for as an employee.

In the meantime, I search for a supervisor in an English university to maybe, maybe start a PhD. I did the paperwork, try to get a scholarship, but without full commitment.

That year of break was the best thing.

(more…)

Calling all Bloggers, Video Bloggers and Instagrammers: Join the GradLife team!

recruitmentsept

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Want to share your story? We are looking for grad students and post-doctoral fellows who are energetic, articulate and passionate about their studies and life outside of academia. 

Apply to be a bloggervideo blogger and/or Instagrammer for our GradLife McGill Team.

Deadline: September 15

Follow @GradLifeMcGill on Facebook and Instagram

Rolling with the Punches: Coping with Change in Grad School

Photo by Flickr user Frederico Cintra.

Photo by Flickr user Frederico Cintra.

Entering the second semester of my master’s, I was following my proposed schedule perfectly. I had completed all of my required course work, applied for funding, and helped with data collection for our second year master’s student. I learned how to use relevant processing programs for my lab work, read what felt like one million articles, and put it all together to develop my thesis topic. From there, I wrote my literature review (after reading more articles), worked tirelessly to process pilot data, and even found an undergraduate student who was willing to help me. Finally, my formal thesis proposal presentation was one month away. I went into my weekly lab meeting feeling very accomplished, ready to informally present my progress and finalize what was going into my presentation.

During that meeting, my thesis topic changed.

(more…)

My experience at Thèsez-vous

Have you heard about this amazing concept that is Thèsez-vous? It is a retreat for grad students in a beautiful and quiet spot where all you have to worry about for three days is writing. For non-French speaking readers, “Thèsez-vous” is a word play between thèse (a thesis) and taisez-vous which means “Be quiet”.

Introduction

The idea came from graduate students who thought about what could help them and other students in the same situation finish their thesis. It all started in June, 2015 and it has been growing ever since. I heard about it from my colleague who is not only working full time but also struggling to finish her memoir. She thought Thèsez-vous would be a nice push to the finish line.

(more…)

Yes, they exist! McGill’s resources for students parents

McGill Family Care Program/ Facebook

McGill Family Care Program/ Facebook

 

As I said, I started a PhD with a 5-months baby at home. I thought I was alone in the world (ok, on the campus), but no! Last year, I don’t remember how, I learned that McGill has just created the Family Care Program. Because students parents are maybe not a big part of the McGill community, but they are certainly not a few, even if they are hard to track.

So I asked the new Family Coordinator, Julia Pingeton, a few questions about the program. I hope it will help other students parents.

Why does the Family Care Program exist?

The Family Care Program exists at McGill because the Senate Subcommittee on Women saw the need for someone dedicated to serving student and staff needs. There has always been someone working on family issues with the faculty at McGill, as the faculty relocation advisor, but there was very little in terms of support for students and staff. They got support from many other groups involved in family care and were able to fund a grant for this position for two years! This program aims to connect students and staff with children with resources on campus and in the greater Montreal community.

(more…)

Publish or Perish

Publishorperish

Eight months ago I submitted my first journal article for publication. I was given lots of invaluable advice from other students and especially from my advisor. Things such as have friends/colleagues give feedback, read articles published by the journal to determine structural and language norms, and of course get an idea of the conversations occurring in the journal articles. I read at least 40 articles previously published in the journal. Then I just wrote it, my first journal article. My advisor gave feedback, and off the article went. This was at the beginning of my PhD studies.

Then, I waited. Forever.

Finally, six weeks ago I received a reply. The reviewers had wonderful comments that were insightful and remarkably helpful. They asked for changes. I mostly felt – wow – I would never have written this today. What a mess! It was not quite (but almost) embarrassing to read what I thought was good, and then finding it was not so good in light of everything I had learned about writing, and about my field of interest (science education). The thing is, there was no commitment to the article. Were they conditionally accepting the article IF I made changes, or …? Or what? Of course I made the required edits, and basically rewrote the entire thing. Groaning about duh, how could I have written this? And then I sent if off again, and the waiting resumed.

WooHoo! It was accepted today, exactly 8 months after I submitted it. So, there it is. Go for it, wait, edit and hope. Personally, what I felt was the best part of this process (aside from having an article accepted, which is quite simply amazing) was what I learned from the peer reviewers. I just learned so much, and I’m using all of of these newly acquired insights in an article that I am currently working on, and hope to submit before the end of the summer.

A McGillian in Paris

Screenshot 2016-07-26 07.01.54

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vMoTHJ3gu3U

So here it is. My first ever video. Actually, that’s only half true. I have made videos before but only the type you keep buried on one of your external hard drives in case the day comes when you want to show your children ‘what life was like when I was a teenager’. So it would be more accurate to say that this is my first ever public video. Fingers crossed it won’t turn out to be one of those that should have remained hidden on my hard drive.

I was lucky enough to go back to Paris this month to see my family and stock up on some good wine, food and company. I wanted to start off with a fun ‘vlog type’ video so decided to film small snippets of Parisian life and show you one of my favourite places to eat: Le Camion Qui Fume. As you’ll see in the video this is one of the most successful burger joints in Paris and you’ll often see a long line of Parisians in front of the food truck on their lunch break hoping to secure an infamous burger. I must admit it’s not the most typical of French cuisine but think of it as a burger American in size and French in style.

I hope you enjoy the video and I’m so excited to share more content with you very soon. Hopefully the video inspired you to give yourself a break from your studying (#McGillianAbroad) or encouraged you to get out and see something new (although you’re probably already out and about chasing Pokemon).

Check out my fellow bloggers and instagrammers for loads more travel inspiration.

Enjoy and see you soon!

Smoothing Out The Grind.

PodCast logo

Part of being a graduate student is liberation! Finally, free of from the shackles of introductory undergraduate classes that are accompanied by the colossus that is studying. Regrettably, being a grad student also pins you into the category of very cheap labor. I personally felt an annoyance of three parts the day I found out that my assistant, a summer student, is paid better than I am because he is paid by the hour.

Though I cannot speak for all graduate students, I do know that for most of my fellow laboratory trainees there exists robots capable of easily automating the larger portion of the bench work we do. That being the case, I am old friends with repetition, a slow and torturous soul-killer that is known to many others as well. Of course repetition is our friend in many ways, helping to squeak our n-values towards significance, still it is also the bane of maintaining an interesting existence.

In my valiant attempts to combat the trials of monotony I have spent a good deal of time sampling the various options available to aid me in battle. Of course the go-to for most people is music, which is all well and good for a lot of people but I have grown to find it disappointingly unstimulating in the long-haul. So what was next for me? Technically I first tried listening to TEDtalk videos as well as talk-radio, but we’ll skip straight to the best thing so far, and that is podcasts! (more…)

Devoir concilier études graduées et maternité

PHDComics.com

PHDComics.com

 

Le 11 février 2013, vers 7h du matin, j’ai découvert avec surprise que j’étais enceinte. Vers 13h le même jour, je recevais un courriel de McGill disant que j’étais acceptée au doctorat en histoire avec une bourse d’entrée. Il y a des jours comme ça où une grosse nouvelle n’attend pas l’autre. Après avoir paniqué, je me suis dit que l’Univers m’envoyait un signe: « go, ma grande, fais les deux.»

Marion a écrit à propos de la conciliation études et travail à temps plein. Personnellement, je dois conjuguer avec la maternité qui prend – littéralement – tout mon temps. J’ai maintenant deux enfants. F-A qui vient de terminer (heureusement) sa phase de terrible two et M-A qui nous gazouille ses sourires du haut de ses 5 mois.

Et je fais un doctorat.

Ces deux aspects de ma vie ont vraiment beaucoup en commun.

D’abord, c’est du temps plein, tout le temps, en tout lieu. Quand je suis à l’école, j’ai toujours mon cellulaire pas loin au cas où fièvre-bobo-autre frappe l’un ou l’autre de mes héritiers. Matins, soirs et fins de semaine sont dédiés à la vie familiale, soit amuser, nourrir et laver l’immense tas de linge sale des petits.

Le doctorat est aussi un plus que temps plein: je travaille dessus la semaine, le soir après le dodo des enfants, pendant les siestes et j’y pense quand mon cerveau n’est pas occupé à gérer des crises de jalousie ou des fous rires. J’y pense quand je pousse la poussette, quand je me couche, quand je range (encore) les jouets qui trainent.

@gradlifemcgill / Instagram

@gradlifemcgill / Instagram

Faire une recherche prenante, c’est comme un bébé: l’immense fierté des progrès, l’incertitude, la remise en question de mes compétences, l’exaspération quand rien ne va comme je veux. Et des fois j’ai envie de tout balancer par la fenêtre.

À intervalle régulier, j’ai juste envie de démissionner de ma thèse ou de ma vie de mère et d’aller vivre sur une île déserte un petit moment ou, de manière plus réaliste, d’aller dans un spa et un bar (ben oui). Mais inévitablement, quand ENFIN j’y arrive, je pense… aux enfants ou la recherche. Surtout s’il y a quelqu’un avec moi. En effet, je passe 100% de mon temps à être mère ou étudiante: les sujets de small talk ne sont pas si nombreux en dehors de ça!

Bref, être mère aux études graduées c’est prenant, épuisant, énervant et… je n’ai envie de faire rien d’autre.

Comment conciliez-vous études graduées à temps plein avec le reste de votre vie?

 

Please don’t make me go on vacation

2016-07-14 22.07.24

I fully realize that this is really messed up. Tomorrow morning, my husband and I are heading off to Newfoundland, the only part of Canada we have never visited (it is all about those yummy ads). Now, I love to travel and see new places.  I have only heard wonderful things about the rugged beauty of Newfoundland. Anywhere that can say “Its about as far from Disney Land as you can possibly get” sounds great to me.

So what’s the problem?

Well, I just want to stay home and write and putter and write and putter.  I understand the importance of maintaining a balance while going to grad school.  Is it really unbalanced to want to stay home? (BTW – I know the answer to this, that’s why I’m going on a vacation).

In my defense, I work full time as a high school teacher, and I am doing this degree full time as well. So I see this as my one opportunity to just be a student and write and putter and write and putter. Of course, friends have said that if I go on a vacation I will come back refreshed and invigorated. But what if I come back stressed out about the lost opportunity to write and putter and write and putter? Pathetic, no?

I have a family member who was a university professor.  We watched him, and kind of judged him because all he did was work.  The entire family had to insist that he take a weekend off once ever summer to go to his daughter’s cottage for one night.  The only way he would go was if we promised that he could leave after lunch on the Sunday. 29 hours away from his work was the max. Here’s the thing – now I get it.

So is it ok if I bring my computer, encourage my husband to bring some books and go for long runs (fitness is important, right?) and hope for rainy days, not sunny days? Cause that’s my plan.

Writing this, I feel like a real slug. I read writing a blog had the potential to be therapeutic. Right now, all I can hope for is self awareness.  Whoa.  Wait a minute – it is going to be great to get away and see the rugged splendor of Gros Morne, the Viking trail and  L’Anse aux Meadows, and eat at awesome restaurants in St. John’s.  OK, its all good – I’m ready to go and have a great vacation.  Blogging IS therapeutic, and it is going to be great.  Really! Now I’m excited.  Have to go and pack.

And don’t forget, success as a grad student means keeping things balanced.  It’s the key.  As well as the ability to laugh at yourself.

Happy trails, to all. Have a great summer, whether you are writing and reading, or enjoying family, or discovering new places to go. Cheers, and all the best.

Francophone à McGill cherche confiance en anglais

Source: Unsplash / https://pixabay.com/fr/américaine-livres-boîtes-boîte-1209605/

Source: Unsplash / pixabay.com

Bonjour,

Je m’appelle Fannie, j’ai décidé volontairement d’étudier à McGill parce que c’est une université anglophone même si…  l’anglais n’a jamais été ma force. Ajoutons à cela une timidité que j’ai mis plus de vingt ans à vaincre pour pouvoir m’exprimer librement et facilement dans ma langue maternelle.

Bref, pour le dire en bon québécois: j’ai la chienne chaque fois que je dois parler ou écrire en anglais.

Ma première session à McGill, soit quatre cours de propédeutique avant de commencer mon doctorat, je l’ai passée avec un mal de tête presque constant. C’est une chose d’écouter des séries américaines et de lire quelques livres par-ci, par-là, mais c’en est une autre de vivre en anglais au quotidien. De devoir comprendre les accents, les termes techniques, de traduire, de lire près de mille pages par semaine dans une langue qui ne m’était pas si familière.

Les premières semaines de cours, je me notais des phrases à l’avance pour pouvoir participer en classe. J’attendais le bon moment pour les lancer, avant de soupirer de soulagement dès que je pouvais retomber dans mon mutisme.

J’ai toujours écrit en français, ayant peur que mes textes ne soient pas à la hauteur de mes idées. Et parce qu’il me faut beaucoup plus de temps pour écrire dans la langue de Shakespeare.

J’ai littéralement tremblé de peur dans mes premières classes en tant que T.A. Je m’excusais à l’avance pour toutes les erreurs que j’allais commettre en anglais.

Et… j’ai survécu.

Je dirais même plus: mon plan masochiste pour m’obliger à améliorer mon anglais a fonctionné. J’ai plus appris en deux ans de doctorat qu’en neuf années de cours à l’école. Plusieurs étudiants de ma première session en tant que T.A. m’ont dit d’arrêter de m’en faire pour le niveau de ma langue. J’ai commencé à penser – et même parfois rêver! – en anglais. Je sais pertinemment que je fais des erreurs, que je cherche parfois mes mots, mais je suis beaucoup moins stressée.

Sauf à l’écrit, the final frontier. Les paroles s’envolent, mais les écrits restent. J’ai encore peur de me jeter à l’eau.

C’est pourquoi la langue a été le thème de mon premier billet. Pour expliquer pourquoi j’écris en français… et pour me donner le défi de faire quelques textes en anglais. Merci d’excuser mes erreurs, n’hésitez pas à me corriger. J’ai plein d’autres qualités, vous allez voir.

Comment se passent vos expériences dans une langue seconde?

 

 

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