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Culturally-Based, Family-Centered Mental Health Promotion for Aboriginal Youth

This is the blog of the Culturally-based, family-centred mental health promotion for Aboriginal Youth project where facilitators, project coordinators and participants share their experiences of working and participating in the programme.

The project takes place in communities across Canada: in British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario, and Quebec. Funded by the Public Health Agency of Canada’s Innovation Strategy, the project aims to develop a culturally based approach to improving the mental health and well-being of youth living in Aboriginal communities across Canada. The program is designed to enhance psychological, social, and emotional well-being among Aboriginal youth, their families and communities. It brings together community partners from across Canada with mental health researchers at several universities.

The community partners include Splatsin, BC, First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Health and Social Services (FNQLHSSC), the Swampy Cree, MB, Anishinabe communities in Sagkeeng First Nation/Fort Alexander of southern MB and Grassy Narrow, Whitedog, and Whitefish Bay First Nations, ON, Mi’gmaq communities in Gesgapegiag First Nations, QC, and Innu community in Mashteuiatsh First Nation, QC.

The academic partners include researchers and mental health practitioners from McGill University, University of Manitoba, University of Minnesota-Duluth, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, University of Regina, and First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Health and Social Services (FNQLHSSC).

For more information on the project, please click here.

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