Keeping up with Anthony Teoli at Infophysiotherapy.com

I graduated from McGill University with a Professional Master’s in Physical Therapy in October 2016. I now work at a private clinic in Montreal and recently developed InfoPhysiotherapy.com, a free information resource for both patients and health professionals. All the content on this website is written by myself. Physiotherapy is an evidence-based profession, and knowledge translation is a crucial part of the advancement of the physiotherapy profession. It is something I have always been keen on.

Read recently posted article “What Is Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome & How Do I Manage It?”

Google allows patients to have access to all the information they could possibly want. However, it may not always be the “right” information. I wanted to provide them with legitimate and valid information that can be backed up by the scientific literature.

The mission of InfoPhysiotherapy.com is to promote evidence-based practice among health care professionals, and to inform the general population regarding injury prevention and management, exercise prescription and healthy living. As well, physiotherapists and patients can discuss any evidence I have presented, or even suggest a topic they would like to know more about. The website also features an online library with the latest publications from the scientific literature.

Infophysiotherapy.com has greatly evolved since it was launched last December. It now features 25 articles covering a large variety of topics and content is added weekly.  In March alone, the website has already received more than 6500 views!

Anthony Teoli, PT

My next step would be to begin collaborating with other physiotherapists, particularly those who specialize in different fields such as pelvic floor or paediatrics, among others. InfoPhysiotherapy.com is continuously in expansion. I look forward to what the future has to offer and please do not hesitate to get in touch with me if you are interested in helping me make a difference!

Anthony Teoli, MScPT

Website link : infophysiotherapy.com

 

Influence of Exercise on Patients with Guillain-Barré Syndrome: A Systematic Review

Two of the group members: N. Simatos Arsenault and P-O. Vincent. Photo: S.C. Marshall

Sometimes, a school assignment can become more than just an assignment.

While in our physiotherapy (PHTH 440) course, our group completed a literature review on the effects of exercise on patients with Guillain-Barré Syndrome as a class assignment.

Our professor, Dr. Marc Roig encouraged us to expand our horizons and attempt to have the assignment become a published article. After about a year and a half of constructive peer reviews from journal editors and having made various modifications, our article was finally published!

Our continued efforts throughout the entire writing and reviewing process paid off and we feel honored to now view our endeavor next to the work of distinguished writers, including some of our current and past professors.

We all appreciate that the SPOT faculty encourages its students to grow beyond conventional paths through diverse opportunities that enable the development of better clinicians.

We have learned a lot through this experience and  hope to continue to develop and grow our professional networks through such opportunities.

In September 2016, we received our final confirmation that our article would be published as part of Volume 68 Issue 4 of the Physiotherapy Canada journal. We were proud and thrilled to hear the news! Read the article here.

Our team,

Pierre-Olivier Vincent, Nicholas Simatos Arsenault, Bai He Shen Yu, Robin Bastien, Aaron Sweeney, and Sylvia Zhu
SPOT Physiotherapy Students

Link to article: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27904236

 

New Global Health Coordinator at McGill SPOT

AnikGHRIblogAnik Goulet, PT

My journey to the School of Physical & Occupational Therapy (SPOT) has not been a simple one but one that I’d like to share with you.

My story starts with the University of Ottawa, where I graduated with a BSc in Physiotherapy- was yet to be a Masters at that point!.  I returned to work in my hometown of Hamilton, Ontario, where I grounded my clinical skills working with an adult population in acute care hospitals, home care and a private clinic. Having enjoyed being a clinical preceptor for over 5 years, I chose to  return to school and complete a Master’s in Education at the University of Ottawa.

It was on January 10th, 2010, while I was teaching at la Cite Collegiale, that I was very emotionally affected by my Haitian students who were devastated  by an earthquake that was happening in their native country. That was the day I told myself that if I could do something to help, I would. And, I did.

My life changing adventure began soon after, in Haiti. I worked in Haiti as a physiotherapist, which eventually lead to working in Afghanistan as a Physiotherapy Supervisor, to Kenya as a Technical Advisor, back to Haiti as a Rehabilitation Coordinator and finally to Lebanon/Jordan to work as a Technical Unit Coordinator for the Syrian refugee situation.  I lived many humbling experiences on these adventures which have brought much insight and reflection to my work and personal life. The desire to continue contributing to the global health sector in my home country has brought me to SPOT to pursue a PhD in Global Health and Rehabilitation.

I am delighted to join the new Global Health Research Initiative (GHRI) at SPOT  in the position of SPOT Global Health Coordinator.  My tasks will include, organizing the monthly Global Health Forum to bring together those interested in rehabilitation and global health for stimulating presentations and dialogue sessions, supporting global health activities at SPOT and liaising with students, faculty, clinicians and other partners interested in the area of rehabilitation and global health.

If you are interested in the work of the GHRI or have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me at spotglobalhealth@mcgill.ca.

Keeping up with Olivier at myphysiothinks

After graduating from McGill University in 2013 with a master’s in physical therapy, Olivier continued to improve and broaden his practice skills by taking several continuing education courses. As a recent graduate, he quickly became aware of the dilemma some newly graduated therapists have when it comes to choosing their continuing education. This led him to create a blog summarizing his thought processes and giving his personal opinion on each continuing education opportunity he has completed. His goal was to help other therapists better their own skills and treatment approaches through an evidence-based approach to physiotherapy.

Physiotherapist, Olivier Lam

Olivier Lam, PT

His most popular blogpost, explaining in simple terms why some pain can be persistent and what can be done to manage it has been translated into  French and Danish by several therapists around the world and reached about 15 000 people across the globe. Read the pain post here.

Today, Olivier is working part time at a clinic in Montreal  and part time private practice while pursuing a master’s in research in health sciences with direct access to a PhD program in research at the University of Sherbrooke. His research at the Universiy of Sherbrooke focuses on neck pain (acute and chronic) and he continues to be involved in research on the efficacy of the McKenzie approach to treat low back pain at McGill University.

To read more about Olivier and his experiences, visit his blog, myphysiothinks, here.

School Based Clinical Fieldwork in Ayukudi, India: Applying the Theory!

Sitara Khan seated with students of ASSA

As Occupational Therapy Masters students, we are required to complete 4 placements in a clinical setting, so when the opportunity to do one internationally arose, I couldn’t say no! Rural South India was a land as foreign to us as we imagined OT might be to it. To our amazement, in the little village with its limited resources and proportionally large population, an inspiring rehabilitation facility, spanning acres of land, had made its place. Amar Seva Sangam (ASSA), a non-profit organization catering to a lifespan of people with disabilities, with its early intervention center, special school, vocational training workshop and extensive spinal cord injury rehabilitation program, offered free services to its population.

Naturally, I worried about our interventions being culturally sensitive and our abilities matching the needs of the population, but I soon realized that the resemblances in the problems we faced, far exceeded the differences. Yes, the setting had fewer material resources than an equivalent center in Canada, but the lack of human resources was an issue that sounded all too familiar!

In our OCC1-617 class, we learned that very few OTs in Quebec practice in school-based settings. Often, a single OT is assigned to an entire school board, resulting in an area of great needs and no service providers. The same challenge presented itself at ASSA: the entire center relied on the services of a single part-time OT. Working at ASSA’s Special School, and quickly became aware that the needs exceeded what I could provide in my 2 month stage, but I wanted to make meaningful change.

In the same course, we were also taught the Partnering for Change model. Though it was developed in Ontario, it was created to tackle the same issue I now faced across the world. Clearly, the model’s relevance was not limited to Canada!

Sitara Khan with some of the teachers at ASSA

The model’s key concepts of collaboration, coaching and partnership, allowed me to provide OT interventions that reached beyond specific students and addressed the larger school context. I saw my clients, the students and the teachers, on a daily basis. I asked to invite the parents at the school multiple times to get their expert input and get them involved. I had “mini-meetings” with groups of teachers to exchange ideas extending beyond my clients to all the students in the school. We discussed classroom adaptations, adjusting teaching materials, managing schedules to ensure all students are alert during activities, and shared ways to ensure positive interaction and learning.

By working with parents and teachers collectively, I know I accomplished more than I would have on my own. The relationship established between all of us was the key to enabling effective change in the students’ lives. This experience allowed me to appreciate the applicability of the Partnering for Change model in all school settings, and its ability to address a problem faced by school-based OTs, not only in Canada or Quebec, but rather, by OTs internationally. In India, despite the language barrier and the cultural differences, this model provided a platform for knowledge translation and effective exchange between professionals, and I am excited to see what changes it brings to school-based OT in Canada when I begin my clinical practice!

By Sitara Khan
OT Masters Student 

More than a Master’s Group Project in Haiti

IMG_7143 (2)

Evans Juste, Physiotherapist

As part of the School’s Global Health Initiative, physiotherapy Master’s student, Evans Juste recently had the opportunity to represent his Master’s Group Project in Haiti, which also included the unique opportunity to visit his parents’ home country. “We found that the future needs would be to advocate to stakeholders and increase available opportunities to those graduating from these programs that are realistic to meet the needs in a third world country” explains Evans.  On a personal level, “It was a true cultural experience for me that I really appreciated, to hear stories from my grandparents, to be welcomed by the people, and to see and experience the country and culture that I had only imagined when I was younger, this was an opportunity for which I am grateful for on both a personal and professional level.”

The project examined professional practice contexts of graduates from three rehabilitation technician programs in Haiti, and explored the graduates’ work profiles and perceptions regarding their readiness to work, difficulties encountered at work, and their vision for professional development. The group produced an informal observation report on the rehabilitation technician program and overall job satisfaction as well as two policy briefs for physiotherapy rehabilitation in patients affected by stroke and traumatic brain injury in this population.

This project was funded by the McBurney Advanced Training Program, through the McGill Institute for Health and Social Policy.

Evans Juste has graduated and is now working at Action Sport, Physio Rivière-des-Prairies!

(more…)

Blog authors are solely responsible for the content of the blogs listed in the directory. Neither the content of these blogs, nor the links to other web sites, are screened, approved, reviewed or endorsed by McGill University. The text and other material on these blogs are the opinion of the specific author and are not statements of advice, opinion, or information of McGill.