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On the In

Few university students haven’t heard of LinkedIn, pleasantly deemed the Facebook equivalent of young professionals and job seekers. Although underdeveloped, many students have started a budding profile on LinkedIn. Typical experiences highlight experiences in faculty and departmental organizations as well as research skills and summer internships.

Nonetheless, not everyone is convinced to invest time into creating a LinkedIn profile. It’s too much effort to create another social media profile and it’s intimidating to jump into a platform where you start afresh with 0 followers. If you already have a strong résumé, why bother with LinkedIn?

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Academic Integrity – whatever you do, obey the rules

donutcheat

Resource: http://www.fsu.ca/academic-integrity.php

Since I am a graduate student, I have the responsibility to teach undergraduate students and help them with their work. So far, my students have given mostly positive feedbacks, and I have tried my best to reply to their emails as soon as possible, to give them tutorials on the knowledge they should get familiar with to write a good report, and to calm them down when small accidents happen (yes there are risks but generally you are safe in an undergraduate teaching lab). Our job description also includes one important thing: grading. Therefore, we need to go through dozens of reports on the same topic. It is exhausting, and not fun at all. We don’t want to give a hard time on our dear students, so most of the time we try to give marks instead of deducting them. I admit that I am quite lenient, but when I deduct marks, I always give the reason. (more…)

April fool’s day – invigilator’s word about how to maximize your chance towards good finals

Copyright: Chibird.com (I hope the last item is never on your list!)

The spring is on its way – birds tweet, flowers bloom, flies start to appear, and finals are around the corner. When we breathe in the breeze of spring, we need to think about finals again. Alas, the semester is short and intense, but at least we have a whole summer to enjoy. (more…)

The Homestretch

Spring is finally starting to make its first appearances after long months of very cold Montreal weather (although apparently, and unfortunately for those like me who are excited about warmer weather, we should expect more cold temperatures and snow heading into April). With that, means, approaching final exams (and long hours at the library), and the impending end of yet another semester. Summer vacation is so close, yet so far, as so many things need to get done before you can start that summer job or take a break from the hectic student life. With only a few weeks left before the start of final exams, here are some of what should be ticked off your checklist in the homestretch:

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Bonjour-Hi, Bye-Bye?

Last year, Québec lawmakers passed a unanimous motion that called on businesses to replace the renowned “Bonjour-hi” with a simple “Bonjour.” While this does not seem to garner any importance, the social circumstances of Montréal’s multiculturalism are at risk. This motion signifies the hard-pressed tactics used by political parties such as the Parti Québécois (PQ) to preserve the French language. Imposing language restrictions in the workplace reflects the rigidity of certain individuals and the antagonism harboured by these peoples towards anglophone communities.

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The Hunt for a Roommate

It’s apartment hunting season and with that comes the decision of where you’ll live and with who. If this is your first year, the thought of leaving the safety and comfort of a McGill residence may seem just a little daunting, albeit probably a little exciting too. For many, moving out of the room you shared with your first roommate also means getting ready to move in with a good friend. For others, it means the start of searching for someone to share a living space with. Here are 5 tips to tackle this search safely and efficiently:

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Why Should I Budget?

There are various resources on campus that may have inspired you to budget: Scholarships & Student Aid Office, Frugal Scholars, and Rez Life amongst others. However, many McGill students do not budget vigorously (and some don’t budget at all).

I am guilty of not budgeting any of my expenses incurred during my time at McGill. One of my resolutions for the new year was to start budgeting so that I could control my cash flow and stop depleting my savings account. Initially, I did not see the point in budgeting because I had a part-time job, I was able to pay rent on time, and I had extra spending money for going out and shopping. But this was an unsustainable lifestyle because my balance at the end of the month was always a solid zero; I never saved up and I never invested my money effectively.

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Multilingualism as an Asset

Bilinguals today make up approximately half of the world’s population. I, myself, grew up in a bilingual household and learned a third language when I began going to school. It is not surprising that in our highly globalized world, being fluent in more than one language is extremely beneficial. Asides from supposedly being better for your neurological health and making communication much easier, being proficient in several languages will often be a serious asset as you progress through your education and enter the workforce.

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Science Jobs Away From Research

McGill is a research-intensive university. To be able to attend a school that places importance on research and study in the field, is a privilege. It offers countless opportunities to students and can be a rewarding and career-changing experience. It’s a pivotal part of your education, especially if you plan on going into academia. But… what if that’s not something you’re interested in? If after your studies, the lab bench or research team is not for you, or maybe you just want a break, here are other job paths in science that you may want to take. Note that some require additional education.

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Why Am I Not Stressed?

I’ve learned a few things about time management, responsibility, and cramming for midterms in my three semesters at McGill. In my U0 year, I had a very different outtake on balancing academics and social activities; I often prioritized the wrong thing and made poor decisions, leaving assignments and homework to the last minute. I wasn’t super involved on campus and I was only taking four courses per semester, so I blamed myself for not staying on track.

However, it took me an entire year to realize that my stress levels had little to do with how much I needed to accomplish. Instead, it had a lot to do with self-care, a healthy lifestyle, and effective studying habits. Today, I am more active within my faculty and I am effectively juggling a heavy course load along with part-time jobs and social commitments. This is what I’m doing to say goodbye to stress: (more…)

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