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My first scientific conference

credit to: PHD Comics (www.phdcomics.com)

As I told you from my last post, I was preparing an oral presentation for a national conference that took place at the end of May. Now I am going to share my experience during that exciting week, and I have learned so much from it. (more…)

Constructing a To-Do List That You’ll Actually Do

I love being organized. I’m the first of my friends to start a group chat for Friday night plans, and I adore a good Powerpoint presentation. My favourite means of organizing my thoughts is the classic to-do list. Classic they may be, to-do lists are often misused. There is the assumption that simply writing a to-do list will result in the completion of tasks. However, because they are often not well-constructed, to-do lists can result in procrastination. Here, I will share a tried and true method of to-do list making that I have devised after my personal failed list attempts. (more…)

A Love Letter to Montreal

When I arrived in Montreal in fall of 2014, full of hope with a splash of  naïveté, I experienced the effortless beauty of the city around me with a general sense of awe and admiration. Interestingly enough, though it had the potential to be foreboding, this new city wasn’t all that threatening. Instead, Montreal became the personal playground of the incoming class of 2014. I think most of my friends would agree we paraded around Montreal as if was an extension of McGill – often to the dismay of the city’s inhabitants.

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Looking for a book? How the ISO affects our studies

Founded on 23 February 1947, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has served to coordinate and unify standards globally. In the past 71 years, the ISO has developed and continues to update over 22 000 standards.[1] You may ask why this is important to students. The unique codes assigned to books and journals that we read on a regular basis were developed by this organization and makes identifying sources that much easier. (more…)

Interview with a Civil Engineer – Part 2

It is without question very intimidating to have to decide what you want to do for the rest of your life, even for those who may have just earned a degree. Last week, I had the chance to sit down with a civil engineer to discuss what this career is like in more depth. If you are still on the fence regarding what you want to study or have just begun your new journey as a university student, and especially if you are leaning towards a career in engineering, you may find his responses to be useful. This is the second part of the interview; the first part can be found here.

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Stages of the Post-Undergrad Life

Post-undergrad life can be confusing for everyone, especially until you at least know what you want to do next. As a recent graduate who completed her program in December and got the diploma to prove it just last week, I’ve had time do some research and self-reflection since December. I’ve come to the realization that post-undergrad life consists of different stages until you find your way, especially if you are stepping into the real world a little uncertain as to what you want to do with the rest of your life. If you already have a plan or a job lined up, then that’s amazing! The truth is, though, about two-thirds of college grads struggle to launch their careers, making life after graduation very disorienting, confusing, and even disappointing. I can assure you, looking at not just me but also what my friends are going through, everyone is more or less experiencing the same thing. (more…)

You graduated! Now what?

As a new graduate, you can expect to experience a flurry of emotions. These may include, but are not limited to, a sense of relief stemming from the fact that you have finally completed your degree. Depending on the particulars of your McGill experience, this accomplishment may have been more or less of an uphill battle. A sense of confusion may be in the mix… a disoriented feeling given that what you’ve worked so hard for over the past few years is now coming to a close. Ideally, your emotional cocktail is topped off with a sprinkle of excitement for what lies ahead. Perhaps the excitement is overshadowed by a sense of impending doom and panic. That’s okay, too! Whatever it may be for you, ultimately, along with this change, you are one step closer to being fully immersed in *real* life. You will be reminded of this fast approaching responsibility time and time again by peers, parents and other family members. “Congrats, you graduated!” They’ll say. Followed promptly by a, “What’s next?
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Interview with a Civil Engineer – Part 1

Many career options are often presented broadly, but offer much more specific branches to choose from. For aspiring engineers, the options are plenty: chemical, mechanical, electrical, computer, civil, software; the list goes on. When you first decide to pursue a degree in one of these, it can be a challenge to feel confident that you’ve made the right decision until you are well into your studies. I recently had the chance to sit down with a civil engineer of over 30 years to discuss what this career is like in more depth. You may find this helpful if you are just embarking on your new journey as a university student or contemplating whether this is the right path for you.

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Key Takeaways from my First Case Competition

The 5th annual Graduate Management Consulting Association of McGill’s Case Competition

During the first two weeks of May, I had the opportunity to participate in the Graduate Management Consulting Association’s (GMCA) annual case competition. I actually tried my first case competition, the Desautels Preparatory Case Competition, hosted at McGill, just over two years ago. (more…)

Note-Taking 101

College is a time to develop many of the fundamental skills that will be essential to you throughout your career. Things like public speaking, problem solving, and collaboration are all vital both at school and in the workforce. One skill that does not tend to receive as much attention is note-taking. Because many of us prefer to use our laptops to take notes and due to the quantity and density of the information taught in class, we often make a habit of transcribing what the professor is saying or copying lecture slides word for word, which is neither efficient nor beneficial.

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