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I Bet Half Of You Haven’t Heard Of…

They’ll match you up with a student who has mastered the course you’re currently in. Think you’re acing the class and the idea of someone helping you for $18 is silly? Think again. The mere act of sitting down to discuss and review even the material that you feel comfortable with is exactly what you’ll thank yourself for when you get to your final exam.

*Newly admitted undergraduate students have their first session free.

They’ll pair you up with one of their “active listeners” (lol I know, but let me finish 😂) — you’ll meet at a local café where you can talk about whatever you like. For free. Although I don’t know if everyone needs “counseling” per se, I do know that an occasional objective opinion can NEVER hurt.

You will get P-A-I-D to interact with people slash pretend to listen to these researchers. Sit back, relax, and enjoy! 💺😌💰

The EASIEST way to be productive is to get a study partner, I repeat, a study 📚 partner, that is, not a “study session” with your BFFS. CLICK. THAT. LINK. Motivation is literally at your fingertips. By filling out this form, you will get paired with a random student who has that same goal of reducing procrastination levels.⚕

*Although this program is run by the Office for Students with Disabilities, all students are eligible to apply.

Not only does listening to classical music elevate your mood, it may also help you focus on your school work. So next time you plop yourself down in McLennan, give this Montreal station a shot. 🎶 There’s a good chance you’ll improve your French while you’re at it.

~xoxo~

To Do Before The Dreadful 7th of January

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And head into the new year with this commercial in mind. Like seriously, was it made especially for students like us who have “no time for anything” yet spend hours mindlessly scrolling on our phones?

  • Subscribe to a new podcast.

Get hooked! Find one you’ll want listen to on your way to class or on your way home from that long day. You’d be surprised how relaxing it could be and how it could give you the ability to say “Hey, I really didn’t know that!” on a weekly basis.

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Do You Fear Learning?

What happens when you meet someone, or work with someone who just never sees eye-to-eye with you? You probably learn to avoid conversations with them, right? Have you ever seen that colleague alone in the break-room and said to yourself “I don’t need that kind of negativity in my life” and decide not to go in? Or maybe you’re not the type to avoid…Maybe you keep having conversations with them, but you find yourself getting frustrated and later ask yourself why you still bother making the effort. But why do we really react this way to people around us?

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Fear, Confusion, and Change- A Search for Answers

It’s hard to think that your choice of study may have been the wrong choice. Some common thoughts are: “maybe I’ve enrolled myself into a program that I thought would give me a good shot at a well-paying job” or “maybe I enrolled into a program for the passion I have for the subject despite knowing the job opportunities are slim”. Sometimes we only realize that we may have made a mistake only after receiving our degrees and entering the work-force. If you’re in one of these places right now you’re probably feeling trapped or anxious. But hey, a semester just came to an end and you owe it to yourself to search for some clarity in all this… (more…)

Report is due, but don’t panic!

Credit to: Calvin and Hobbes (Scientific Setbacks)

As graduate students, we are often assigned teaching jobs, most commonly lab and course TAs. I really enjoyed my time with students when we did lab work together (I’m a lab TA), and we chitchatted about life, study, weather, or  future. My colleagues have various working styles, but in general we are a bunch of cooperative ants focusing on our tasks. On the other hand, grading several dozens of lab reports is the most painful moment at the end of every experiment cycle – we are sad to see people forgetting what we emphasized during the experiment, not double-checking the formatting, giving us blah-blahs without even reading the background information… (more…)

First Post Ever — TOP TIPS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Take advantage of the resources here. 

McGill has endless opportunities designed specifically for you to learn new things and meet new people. I can vouch for the fact that there is literally something for every single person sitting in Leacock 132, so be sure to soak up all the benefits you could from your undergrad/graduate experience. Because, as cliche as it may sound, before you know it, it will be too late.

  1. Office hours. Never. A waste. Of time.

Whether it be with your professor or your TA, you will ALWAYS learn something useful… Even if it means learning that emailing might be the better option for next time. 😂

  1. #SELFCARE

The single most important thing you could do for yourself, because only once you are in a healthy mental and physical state, can you perform your very best and go on to helping others. 

  1. Attendance

A direct determinant of your grade.

(Okay this was a controversial one, I know)

Now I suck at math, but here is a formula based on my personal experience:

f (attendance) = grade

  1. Find what works best for you.

EVERYONE IS DIFFERENT, to each their own. That being the case, college is also about learning who you are and how you function as a person — from learning how you study best, and what teaching styles and methods of evaluation (if applicable) work for you, all the way to learning how to dig up your real priority at a given moment. Sounds a little tricky eh?

*Number 5 is only possible through this thing we call experience, so don’t get discouraged and just keep going, but more significantly, remember to LEARN as you go ❤

~xoxo~

So, About Volunteering…

Have you been adamant about volunteering throughout your academic career? Have you been told that volunteer work is extremely important for building your resume? I’ve definitely heard this before, and I’ve been hearing about it since high school. But I have to admit— I’m a little late to jump onto the volunteering wagon. And it isn’t all my fault. Let me tell you why…

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Graduate life – Take the advantage of academic seminars

Resource: Vanderbilt University website

First of all, Happy Halloween! I hope you are enjoying a wonderful (although rainy) day of pumpkin spices, costumes and fun with friends. Today, I would also like to talk about how to make the most out of academic seminars.

I believe that each department has their own schedule of academic seminars and talks. Here I just use Department of Chemistry as an example. Each Tuesday afternoon, one invited speaker (usually professors) gives an 1-hour talk on their research. As everyone can imagine, the research themes cover the whole spectrum of chemistry – inorganic, synthetic, biological, medicinal, etc.

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Some More Advice

One year ago, I started writing on this blog with an advice post outlining seven tips to succeed in your first year of university. They were specifically aimed at first year students and were meant to come in addition to the many pieces of advice students already receive before starting college. To wrap up this past year of blog posts, I wanted to present some more advice in the form of seven more tips – some new things I’ve learned along the way and some life reminders, especially to those who will be heading out at the end of the academic year.

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Book Review: Mind Gym, Part 2

In this post, I am going to cover how different concepts from Mind Gym[1] can be applied by students. You may be familiar with some of them from other ‘self-help’ type books, from workshops on time or stress and anxiety management, or already use them without giving them names. I am going to give overviews of the power of positive thinking, motivation and fear of failure, and SMART goals. All of these contribute to getting ‘in the zone’ and succeed at everyday tasks or activities. (more…)

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