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Figuring out What to Do After Graduation

Graduation brings up many questions intermixed with feelings of accomplishment. The years culminate in walking on stage and receiving that much sought after piece of paper, the diploma. Still, questions persist: Where will I live? What sort of job will I find? Should I pursue a graduate degree? Where will my friends find themselves? These are all important to consider. After all, the process of becoming a fully-fledged adult is understandably nerve-wracking. Pondering these very questions is what led me to speak to Corey Dickinson, a master’s student(MSc) in Development Geography, here at McGill University about his journey.

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A Career in GIS

GIS is a system used to manipulate and visualize geographic data. There are many applications ranging from environmental protection to emergency response. It is an incredibly helpful tool that allows users to “picture” data and further analyze it.

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Journalism, Law, and Teaching: Max Bell School of Public Policy Professor Mark Lloyd’s Insight

 Mark Lloyd, a professor of professional practice in the Max Bell School of Public Policy, is addressing how students think about issues. In his Coms 362 Communication Rights and Wrongs course, he wants us to understand the policies at play that directly impact our lives. Working in journalism, he witnessed firsthand how communication policy changes altered the news. What people wanted to see wasn’t suddenly different, the structures providing them were. Besides a long career in journalism, Professor Lloyd worked as a lawyer, at a private firm as well as the Federal Communications Commission, the FCC. He was part of the Clinton transition team at the White House, involved with thinktanks, and a visiting professor at MIT, USC – Annenburg, and Georgetown University. His career is marked by pursuing his interests and searching for why things are how they are.

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Coffee – The Perfect Excuse to Grow Your Network

— “Would you like to have a coffee and talk with me about…?”

I call it coffee.

Many call it an informational interview. The formal jargon sounded daunting to me when I first began exploring careers… imagine… “Would you like to have an informational interview with me?”

Really, an informational interview is just coffee with conversation (or a smoothie, or a walk for ice cream, whatever works). Yes, the conversation takes prep work on our part and a little luck in finding the right connections, but it’s one of our best tools in developing our professional identities and broadening our network. (more…)

Recent Volunteer Experience

During the month of May, I immersed myself into the world of three very different, but equally pertinent concepts: physical education, animal welfare, and energy conservation.

The 2019 PHE National Conference

As a volunteer at Physical and Health Education Canada’s event held right here at the Currie Gym, I mainly helped with the registration of attendees. Meaning, I got to see many faces, and finally got to experience what career and academic advisors have been telling me for the past two years — that career paths are certainly based on your grades, on your interests, and on how well you respond to that “tell me about yourself” interview question, but nowhere near as much as they are based on your personality.

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Finding Your Dream Job

https://www.themuse.com/advice/9-questions-thatll-help-you-find-your-dream-career

When you’re talking to family and friends about your job prospects and what you hope to achieve someday, you often hear, “go after your dream” or “do whatever makes you happy.” If you’ve already figured out what you want to do, then that’s great! However, if you’re not sure what your dream job entails or what you want to do with your degree, hearing the same sentence over and over again can create the opposite effect and make you feel more self-conscious. Figuring out your dream job can be tricky but here are some useful tips to help you get there:

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Looking Back at Two Years of University

Going to college was one of the big worries of high school. Where was I going to go and to study what? How would I settle into a life very different from everything I had ever known? At the time it seemed very intimidating and something I apprehended greatly just because of the uncertainty of it all. There was so much doubt, worry and confusion going into my first year, but looking back now, halfway through my undergraduate degree, my attitudes and thoughts have changed. These might be helpful to any first year students going through a similar experience.

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Municipal Elections Matter, Part 3: Women and Municipal Politics

It is commonly thought that women are more successful in municipal politics than federal or provincial politics. This conclusion is reached since municipal elections are typically less competitive and their campaigns presumed to be less costly. [1] At the same time, women may be at a disadvantage because of how the media frames female candidates or if voters perceive politics as ‘male sphere’.[2] Erin Tolley and Mireille Paquette explored to effect of gender in the 2017 race for mayor of Montreal between Denis Coderre and Valérie Plante.[3]With a rising number of women stepping up to run for office in Canada and the United States, it is interesting to understand what barriers exist or are being challenged.

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Volunteering in Montreal

https://the-peak.ca

As the summer is coming to an end and the new school year is approaching, you may be thinking about this year’s extracurricular activities and student clubs you would want to participate in. This year, instead of opting for on-campus clubs and activities, why don’t you step out of the McGill bubble to contribute to the Montreal community? Here is a list of organizations you can volunteer at or can at least help you find other places you can volunteer at, no matter what your interests and majors are:

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Municipal Elections Matter, Part 2: Nationalism and Party Identification

When voting, is your decision something based on a singular issue or is it about how much you identify with the party? Perhaps one issue shapes the entire party landscape? This question is fundamental to many who study political science, but until attending CMES, I had no idea that municipal politics were a field of study. In all my introductory political science courses at McGill, the topic was never touched upon. Thus, I jumped at the opportunity to learn more about the study of municipal politics, which has been studied in Canada for many years. In this post, I will focus on how municipal politics interact with Quebec nationalism, an issue Canada has worked with and around since the British won the Seven Years’ War.[1] (more…)

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