Life of a Climate Scientist: A Grad Student Spotlight on Holly Kyeore Han

Introduction by Holly Kyeore Han (she/her) and original interview by Ichiko Sugiyama (she/her)* 

Holly at a gate of the Serengeti National Park during the SEG trip to Tanzania.

Holly did an interview with the EGU (European Geosciences Union) Climate Science Division back in January 2021, as part of their Life of Climate Scientist series. She was excited to do it because it allowed her to share her academic journey and her perspectives on science and life in general. In the interview, she talks about how she entered a graduate program and her research in geophysics. She also shares what motivates her in science, how science helps her achieve her life goals, and what she thinks we as graduate students and scientists could find values in many other things than just scientific achievements.

 

Here is the link to the interview: https://blogs.egu.eu/divisions/cl/2021/03/08/life-of-a-climate-scientist-presents-holly-kyeore-han/

 

Holly on frozen Lake Baikal during her trans-Siberian railway trip in Russia.

Holly says, “Doing science is meaningful and exciting because it allows me to explore nature across time and space while connecting me to society in many practical ways. And I am sure everyone has different motivations in pursuing their science. Speaking up, listening, and respecting each other’s stories and causes will strengthen our community and allow us to level up EDI (Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion). So, what are your story and your motivation? I hope this interview gives you a chance to step back and think/share your passion, reasons, or whatever makes you continue (or stop) in life. I hope everyone stays healthy and safe! Big Hugs!”

 

 

*Ichiko Sugiyama is a Ph.D. candidate in the field of biogeochemistry at the Weizmann Institute of Science, and part of the editorial team for the EGU climate division blog. Her research combines experiments and models to understand the ancient marine iron cycle as well as better constrain metal and nutrient cycling in the Precambrian ocean.”

 

 

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