Happy Un-New Year!

Humpty_Dumpty_Tenniel

If you know your Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass, you would be familiar with an un-Birthday. As explained by Humpty Dumpty: “There are three hundred and sixty-four days when you might get un-birthday presents… and only one for birthday presents, you know.” (Carroll, 2009). So, an extension of the concept is that any significant day could be celebrated any time – 364 days of the year (minus one of course, because that is the actual day).

Personally, I think September is a better time to celebrate New Year’s Day. Specifically, the day following Labour Day. This year, September 6th. Why? Because everything is ahead, untouched. New classes, new deadlines, new friends to discover. All is possible, ready to be revealed, and free to the imagination. As well, it is really the only time that I find myself setting goals and resolutions. I am back planning now so I can be where I need to be by the end of May 2017. Summer is over, and the time has come to face new challenges. For students, the day following Labour Day is the real fresh start of a new year. The dog days of summer (a summer period marked by lethargy, inactivity, or indolence) are in the past, the seasons are changing, as are daily routines and schedules. So let’s get on with it! What goals and resolutions are you setting as we transition through the Un-New Year?

HAPPY UN-NEW YEAR to all new and returning graduate students. Hope your summer was restful and invigorating. Now is the time to set some goals, and go for it. All the best in the new year. Cheers and good luck.

Carroll, L., Haughton, H., & Carroll, L. (2009). Alice’s adventures in Wonderland ; and, Through the looking-glass and What Alice found there. New York: Penguin Classics.
Photo: Creative Commons Through the Looking-Glass, illustration by John Tenniel. Source:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Humpty_Dumpty_Tenniel.jpg

Publish or Perish

Publishorperish

Eight months ago I submitted my first journal article for publication. I was given lots of invaluable advice from other students and especially from my advisor. Things such as have friends/colleagues give feedback, read articles published by the journal to determine structural and language norms, and of course get an idea of the conversations occurring in the journal articles. I read at least 40 articles previously published in the journal. Then I just wrote it, my first journal article. My advisor gave feedback, and off the article went. This was at the beginning of my PhD studies.

Then, I waited. Forever.

Finally, six weeks ago I received a reply. The reviewers had wonderful comments that were insightful and remarkably helpful. They asked for changes. I mostly felt – wow – I would never have written this today. What a mess! It was not quite (but almost) embarrassing to read what I thought was good, and then finding it was not so good in light of everything I had learned about writing, and about my field of interest (science education). The thing is, there was no commitment to the article. Were they conditionally accepting the article IF I made changes, or …? Or what? Of course I made the required edits, and basically rewrote the entire thing. Groaning about duh, how could I have written this? And then I sent if off again, and the waiting resumed.

WooHoo! It was accepted today, exactly 8 months after I submitted it. So, there it is. Go for it, wait, edit and hope. Personally, what I felt was the best part of this process (aside from having an article accepted, which is quite simply amazing) was what I learned from the peer reviewers. I just learned so much, and I’m using all of of these newly acquired insights in an article that I am currently working on, and hope to submit before the end of the summer.

Please don’t make me go on vacation

2016-07-14 22.07.24

I fully realize that this is really messed up. Tomorrow morning, my husband and I are heading off to Newfoundland, the only part of Canada we have never visited (it is all about those yummy ads). Now, I love to travel and see new places.  I have only heard wonderful things about the rugged beauty of Newfoundland. Anywhere that can say “Its about as far from Disney Land as you can possibly get” sounds great to me.

So what’s the problem?

Well, I just want to stay home and write and putter and write and putter.  I understand the importance of maintaining a balance while going to grad school.  Is it really unbalanced to want to stay home? (BTW – I know the answer to this, that’s why I’m going on a vacation).

In my defense, I work full time as a high school teacher, and I am doing this degree full time as well. So I see this as my one opportunity to just be a student and write and putter and write and putter. Of course, friends have said that if I go on a vacation I will come back refreshed and invigorated. But what if I come back stressed out about the lost opportunity to write and putter and write and putter? Pathetic, no?

I have a family member who was a university professor.  We watched him, and kind of judged him because all he did was work.  The entire family had to insist that he take a weekend off once ever summer to go to his daughter’s cottage for one night.  The only way he would go was if we promised that he could leave after lunch on the Sunday. 29 hours away from his work was the max. Here’s the thing – now I get it.

So is it ok if I bring my computer, encourage my husband to bring some books and go for long runs (fitness is important, right?) and hope for rainy days, not sunny days? Cause that’s my plan.

Writing this, I feel like a real slug. I read writing a blog had the potential to be therapeutic. Right now, all I can hope for is self awareness.  Whoa.  Wait a minute – it is going to be great to get away and see the rugged splendor of Gros Morne, the Viking trail and  L’Anse aux Meadows, and eat at awesome restaurants in St. John’s.  OK, its all good – I’m ready to go and have a great vacation.  Blogging IS therapeutic, and it is going to be great.  Really! Now I’m excited.  Have to go and pack.

And don’t forget, success as a grad student means keeping things balanced.  It’s the key.  As well as the ability to laugh at yourself.

Happy trails, to all. Have a great summer, whether you are writing and reading, or enjoying family, or discovering new places to go. Cheers, and all the best.

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