A snapshot of the first four weeks

kelly_mcmillanBy Kelly McMillan

The first four weeks of my stay here in Kampala, Uganda, have been a whirlwind. If I didn’t contribute to this page earlier, it’s not for want of subject matter. Rather, I have been trying to wrap my head around everything I have been seeing and experiencing—both in my daily life and in terms of the legal issues I have been exploring in my internship.

Children and youth from the refugee community participate in an SGBV workshop at Old Kampala Primary School, May 15, 2010

Children and youth from the refugee community participate in an SGBV workshop at Old Kampala Primary School, May 15, 2010

Since my arrival, I have been busy getting lost in the chaos of Kampala’s taxi parks; learning to say “I don’t eat meat” (silia nyama) and other choice phrases in Luganda; sampling Ugandan cuisine (posho [known elsewhere in East Africa as ugali], matoke [mashed plantain], mputa [Nile Perch]); listening to  stories of the Buganda kingdom; venturing through congested markets on the shores of Lake Victoria (ten minutes from my house); not to mention dealing with such common occurrences as power outages, water shortages, vehicle break-downs and flash flooding! Just getting through the day in Kampala has proved exhilarating, to say the least.

At work, the learning curve has been just as steep. The Refugee Law Project is a large, bustling NGO of approximately 65 local and international staff, interns and volunteers. RLP is part community legal clinic, part crisis centre, part public policy advocate, part research institute, and part language school. At any given moment, dozens of refugees from a handful of countries can be found milling around the front courtyard waiting for legal or counseling services; attending English-language classes in the back; or even—in the case of one refugee women’s association—giving back by cleaning the office on a Friday afternoon.

I work in RLP’s Legal & Psychosocial Department (LPD). I spent my first two weeks assisting with the planning and execution of a week of events to raise awareness on sex and gender-based violence in the refugee community, including a children’s workshop, a police training and a roundtable discussion with stakeholders.

More recently, I have started doing “intake”, which is essentially the front line of RLP’s services. I listen to the client’s story and if her situation falls within one of the LPD’s program areas, I schedule a moment later in the week to take the client’s detailed testimony (everything from her experiences in her country of origin to her life here in Uganda). If the problem does not fall within RLP’s mandate, I refer the client to another organization.

One of my passions as a law student has been community legal services, and I am certain that interacting with RLP’s clients will be the most rewarding aspect of my time here. Nonetheless, I don’t think anything could have prepared me for some of the stories I’ve listened to over the past two weeks. So while my first month has been largely devoted to settling into a new city, a new culture and a new workplace environment, I have also taken the time to step back and reflect on some the social and legal issues facing Kampala’s refugees. I look forward to sharing these thoughts in later posts.

*Internship undertaken with the financial support of the Government of Canada provided through the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA)

Leave a Reply

Blog authors are solely responsible for the content of the blogs listed in the directory. Neither the content of these blogs, nor the links to other web sites, are screened, approved, reviewed or endorsed by McGill University. The text and other material on these blogs are the opinion of the specific author and are not statements of advice, opinion, or information of McGill.