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Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit (IQ): Traditional Knowledge in the Contemporary World Virtual Roundtable

In March 2021, Aaju Peter, Inuit cultural advisor and lecturer, began a ceremony with the lighting of the sacred Qulliq, a traditional lamp. The Qulliq’s lighting opened McGill’s first Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit (IQ): Traditional Knowledge in the Contemporary World Virtual Roundtable, organized by McGill’s Professor Marianne Stenbaek.

The Virtual Roundtable was supported in part by funds from a SSHRC Connection Grant, which support events and outreach activities to exchange knowledge and to engage with participants on research. The aims of the roundtable included to showcase Inuit culture and wisdom, and to explore how Inuit traditional knowledge is relevant to contemporary society, both for Inuit and non-Inuit peoples. Featuring Inuit and non-Inuit scholars, artists, and activists from across Inuit Nunaat and Lower Canada, the day comprised of three sessions: “We Believed in the Words of Our Elders”; “Our past, Our Present, Our Future”; and “Honoring the Timeless Creative Genius of the Inuit.” 

Click here to read more about this event, which was written by Wáhiakatste Diome-Deer

Owén:na Tewahthá:rahkw : Summer Speaker Series in collaboration with Ionkwahronkha’onhátie’

The Indigenous Studies and Community Engagement Initiative (ISCEI) at McGill, in collaboration with Kanien’kéha-learners group Ionkwahronkha’onhátie’, is hosting an online Workshop Series this summer with the goal of furthering knowledge and awareness about tools for language learning, transmission, and documentation, and identifying topics and tools to help language learners gain knowledge and skills in areas of interest in their language-learning paths.

This new Speaker Series features talks given by Noelani Arista, James Crippen, Sandra-Lynn Leclaire, Marianne Mithun, among others.

About Ionkwahronkha’onhátie’:

Ionkwahronkha’onhátie’, “We are becoming fluent,” is a grassroots group created by and for second language speakers who are revitalizing the Kanien’kehá:ka “Mohawk” language. The group exists across Kanienkehá:ka communities and extends to all spaces that our language can be spoken. The goals of Ionkwahronkha’onhátie’ are to, in full-immersion settings, (1) support second language speakers throughout their language learning journey, (2) provide and continue to develop a network of speakers, and to (3) re-center our elders and first language speakers to prioritize language and knowledge transmission.

 

School of Continuing Studies Hosts Lectures and Workshops for National Indigenous History Month

During the month of June, the School of Continuing Studies will be hosting various talks and workshops for National Indigenous History Month.

See two of the interactive presentations given by Wanda Gabriel and Alex Allard Gray:

Wanda Gabriel Presents: A Look at the Truth & Reconciliation Commission 

Wednesday June 2, 10:30-12:00 EST 

In this session led by Wanda Gabriel participants explore the five different types of elements addressing the legacy of Residential Schools, as listed in The Settlement Agreement. One of the elements, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) will be examined in detail. Participants will look at the process of this historical commission of their years of operation and how they carefully approached survivors to gather the stories. Particular focus will be on the calls to action and what this means for Canadians. Participants will be invited to explore, share views and find ways to engage in the calls to action via breakout rooms.

 

Alex Allard Gray Presents: Braiding Sweetgrass; Understanding Indigenous Resilience and Making Space for Indigenous Ways of Thinking

Tuesday June 29, 10:30-12:00 EST

In this interactive presentation, participants will have the opportunity to discuss and learn of ways to incpororate and create space for Indigenous ways of thinking into their work. Indigenous Resilience will be highlighted through examples pertaining to the presenter’s community and how his Indigenous identity guides his work with Indigenous learners.

 

See the Full Schedule and Info Here

2021 Margaret A. Gilliam Lecture in Food Security: Indigenous Food Sovereignty

For this year’s 2021 Margaret A. Gilliam Lecture in Food Security, join Jacquelyn Wright (President and CEO, Canadian Feed The Children); Glenn Checkley (Program Manager, Canadian Feed The Children); Glenna Cayen (Food Forest Project Coordinator, Canadian Feed The Children); and Ernie Bussidor (Project Leader, the Seal River Watershed Initiative) for a four-part presentation on Supporting Indigenous Food Sovereignty: A Community-led Approach to Reclaiming Food Systems & Nourishing Communities.

Click here to register 

Debrief Circle: Looking back at Change the Name

As a reminder, today (Feb 8th) at 5:30pm, there will be a debrief circle concerning the recent name change of the Men’s Varsity Team. Indigenous students, staff, faculty, and alumni are invited to this event.

This circle intends to provide closure to the campaign and provide an opportunity for the Indigenous community on campus to collectively heal from the emotional and mental distress that was experienced on a variety of levels.

You can register for this circle here.

Looking Back at ‘Change the Name’: A Debriefing Circle

On February 8th at 5:30PM (EST), there will be a debriefing circle focusing on the Change the Name campaign.
This circle intends to provide closure to the campaign and provide an  opportunity for the Indigenous community on campus to collectively heal from the emotional and mental distress that was experienced on a variety of levels.
This event is open to Indigenous students, faculty/staff and alumni. It will be facilitated by Konwatsitsa:wi Meloche, who is a community member of Kahnawá:ke, and the circle will be open and closed by an Elder, Michael Standup. As well, participants will receive a small gift for taking the time to participate in this event. This meeting will not be recorded.

Anti-Racist and Decolonial Work in the Academy and Beyond: Registration Open

Registration for the upcoming talks in the Department of English’s Speaker Series has opened. To learn more about this series and ISCEI’s involvement, check out our previous post about it here. These talks are free but require an RSVP, if you would like to register, please follow the links below!

 

Vicky Boldo (Cree/Métis), Autumn Godwin (nehithaw iskwew), Laurence Lainesse (white settler): “Collective Resistance & Solidarity: Creating Social and Decolonial Change” (January 27, 3-5pm EST)

Register to attend this talk here

 

Kim TallBear (Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate): “Diversity v. Decolonization in the Academy” (February 9, 5-6pm EST)

Register to attend this talk here

Speaker Series: How to Do Anti-Racist and Decolonial Work Within the Academy and Beyond McGill Department of English

The EGSA’s 2020-21 Equity and Diversity Committee has organized a four-part webinar / speaker series entitled “How to Do Anti-Racist and Decolonial Work Within the Academy and Beyond.” It will take place in January and February 2021 and is open to both graduate students and faculty members of McGill’s Department of English.

With the support of ISCEI and the Mellon Grant, this series includes Indigenous speakers who will be sharing their knowledge on this topic. Indigenous speakers include Vicky Boldo, Autumn Godwin and Kim Tallbear. See below for some of the topics and speakers in this series!

 

Beth Berila: “Building an Anti-Racist Culture” (January 14, 9-12pm EST)

This interactive workshop will explore how to practice anti-racism at the individual, collective, and structural levels in your department. We will discuss what is already working and generate best practices for anti-racism in our lives, pedagogies, departmental practices/policies, and communities.

Vicky Boldo (Cree/Métis), Autumn Godwin (nehithaw iskwew), Laurence Lainesse (white settler): “Collective Resistance & Solidarity: Creating Social and Decolonial Change” (January 27, 3-5pm EST)

Are you open-minded? Do you welcome diversity and difference as an opportunity to learn and broaden yourself both professionally and personally? Are respect and dignity important for you in team building and community service? This two-hour workshop is intended to provide a culturally safe space for exchange between each of the participants and the presenters. From a perspective of lived experience, we will discuss different strategies of resistance and solidarity implemented by the facilitators and participants in their own communities and within colonial structures of Canada and Quebec. Let’s engage and explore how collective actions of solidarity and resistance can contribute toward the reconstruction of a more just and decolonial society.

Kim TallBear (Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate): “Diversity v. Decolonization in the Academy” (February 9, 5-6pm EST)

In Eve Tuck and K. Wayne Yang’s seminal 2012 article, “Decolonization is not a metaphor,” they define decolonization as bringing about “the repatriation of Indigenous land and life.” With this concrete transfer of (re)sources in mind, Dr. TallBear will address the differences between “diversity and inclusion” vs. decolonization. Also drawing on Adam Gaudry’s and Danielle Lorenz’s 2018 article “Indigenization as inclusion, reconciliation, and decolonization,” TallBear argues for a more critical approach than the settler state’s multicultural model of inclusion—one that seeks to aid repatriatiation of “land and life.” Dr. TallBear will provide concrete examples of what repatriation looks like in the context of academic decolonization.

Bettina Love: “We Gon’ Be Alright, But That Ain’t Alright: Abolitionist Teaching and the Pursuit of Educational Freedom” (February 22, 5-6pm EST)

Dr. Love’s talk will discuss the struggles and the possibilities of committing ourselves to an abolitionist goal of educational freedom, as opposed to reform, and moving beyond what she calls the educational survival complex. Abolitionist Teaching is built on the creativity, imagination, boldness, ingenuity, and rebellious spirit and methods of abolitionists to demand and fight for an educational system where all students are thriving, not simply surviving.

 

Robin Gray Guest Lecturing in the Department of Sociology on January 22nd

On January 22nd from 10:30 – 12PM, Robin Gray will be presenting her research titled: “Repatriating Indigenous Cultural Heritage: A Case of Ts’msyen Songs”. This presentation is part ofa larger speaker series in the Department of Sociology. Information on how to access this lecture will be provided below.

Robin Gray is Ts’msyen and Mikisew Cree, and an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto Mississauga. Dr. Gray’s current research projects focus on the repatriation of Ts’msyen songs from archives, and foundational issues related to the preservation, management, ownership, access and control of Indigenous cultural heritage.

The repatriation of Indigenous cultural heritage, ranging from bodies and objects to knowledge, is a socio-cultural, spiritual, and political priority for Indigenous communities worldwide. Although Indigenous peoples have had varying levels of success securing the release of their ancestors and belongings from captivity, the repatriation of intangible heritage such as song is a relatively new domain. Drawing on research from an ongoing case study to repatriate a single collection of Ts’msyen songs from multiple archives with, by and for Ts’msyen from Lax Kw’alaams, BC, this talk will offer considerations about the colonizing properties of intellectual property, the reach of Indigenous dispossession in the archive, and why Indigenous laws should be respected as precedent for ownership, access, and control of Indigenous cultural heritage.

To listen to her lecture on the 22nd, you can click here for the zoom link or enter the meeting ID/passcode here:

Meeting ID: 839 2499 2870
Passcode: 042833

“Knowledge Mobilization: from SSHRC Buzzword to Actual Meaningful Thing”: Online Workshop for Graduate Students

The Centre for Indigenous Research and Community-Led Engagement (CIRCLE) announced a SAGE online workshop on Friday Nov. 13th 2020, from 12:00-1:30 PM (PST) with Dr. Shiri Pasternak titled: “Knowledge Mobilization: from SSHRC Buzzword to Actual Meaningful Thing”.

Have you come across the term ‘knowledge mobilization’ when tediously filling out grant applications? Have you wondered why this language of war is used to describe the thing you are quietly doing in libraries and in your room? And what you can do, beyond peer-review publishing, to impact the world with your research? Using Yellowhead Institute resources, tools, and “collaterals” as examples (plus some other great forms of public intervention), this workshop is a crash course on making knowledge matter beyond normal academic outputs.

Shiri Pasternak is a professor of criminology at Ryerson University in Toronto. She is also the Research Director at the Yellowhead Institute, a First Nations’-focused and -led think tank based at Ryerson. She is the author of the award-winning book Grounded Authority: the Algonqins of Barriere Lake Against the State, and a bunch of other articles and essays all obsessively focused on abolishing the settler state.

Registration is limited and open to UVic graduate students, faculty, and staff as well as Indigenous graduate students throughout Canada. Register in advance for this meeting: https://uvic.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZMrd-mqpzsjG9UX1QoHThmKFgTPfLGMS5Lb

 

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