McGill Welcomes new Indigenous Faculty

On October 27th, McGill formally welcomed seven Indigenous academic staff (one being a recent hire who was not able to attend precious ceremonies), following a series of hires across departments and faculties. The welcome ceremony took place virtually and included prayer and ceremony by Indigenous Elders.

This series of hires stems from the Provost’s Task Force on Indigenous Studies and Indigenous Education, who called upon the University to set a target of appointing at least 35 Indigenous tenure-track or tenured professors by 2032.

Welcome and congratulations again on joining McGill!

Click here to read the full article from the McGill Reporter to learn more about the new hires.

Political Science professor Yann Allard-Tremblay receives SSHRC Insight Development Grant

Yann Allard-Tremblay, a recently-hired professor in the Department of Political Science, received an SSHRC Insight Development Grant. The grant funding supports research projects by scholars to develop new research questions and/or approaches. In the 2019-20 applicant pool, Allard-Tremblay received a total of $44,943 for 2 years.
Allard-Tremblay’s research focuses on “Disjunctive Indigenous Resistance and the Transformation of Political Thought”. The project “sets itself the problem of thinking about politics in light of the specific Canadian context of settler colonialism. It seeks to offer a theoretical synthesis and elucidation of the literature on Indigenous resurgence and revitalization. As well, it seeks to build on this synthesis to contribute to the decolonization and indigenization of Political theory; and to the reconciliation of Western political theory with Indigenous political thought.”
Congratulations on receiving the grant!

McGill Student and Professor attend 2020 Beading Symposium

The 2020 Beading Symposium: Ziigimenshin, was held February 6-9th. It is the second iteration of the Beading Symposia, with the first being held in Tkaronto in 2019. This year’s iteration took place in Winnipeg and was organized by the Manitoba Craft Council (MCC) in partnership with Urban Shaman, Manitoba Museum, with ancillary programming by MAWA (Mentoring Artists for Women’s Art). The symposium served as a place to contribute to the scholarly study of Contemporary Indigenous Art, with a focus on community and the role beadwork has in it.

With travel funding support from the Andrew W. Mellon-funded ISCEI, McGill Art History student Hana Nikčević and Professor Gloria Bell traveled to attend the symposium.

Alongside the symposium, attendees were also able to visit exhibitions such as Endurance ….. Patience curated by Daina Warren at Urban Shaman and Community Beading Table Group Show curated by Niahm Dooley at Mentoring Artists for Women’s Art (MAWA).

Hana Nikcevic discussed her experience at the Symposium, and particularly appreciated “the chance to learn about beadwork as a creative practice with resonances for cultural heritage, intergenerational knowledge transfer, community building, and aesthetic experimentation.”

The Symposium also focused on contemporary beading and encouraged participants to bring their own projects to work on at the many beading tables that fostered community and new connections. Ziigimenshin provided a space to explore and create a dialogue about the interrelatedness of history and present, theory and practice, creativity, and community.

To learn more about ISCEI’s funding opportunities, click here!

Noelani Arista’s “The Kingdom and the Republic” wins major book award

Incoming McGill history professor and Director of the Indigenous Studies program, Noelani Arista, was awarded the Best 2019 First Book in Native American and Indigenous Studies Prize earlier this year for her book, The Kingdom and the Republic: Sovereign Hawai’i and the Early United States (University of Pennsylvania Press)Professor Arista discusses her book in a recent article in the University of Hawai’i News:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Noted were her use of previously unused written historical records in the Hawaiian language, and her ability to contextualize Hawaiian history in “Hawaiian understandings of the past.” David Chang, of the University of Minnesota, says that with this book, Arista “transforms the way we understand Hawai’i in the crucial decades between 1820 and 1840. She upends a simplistic colonial historiography that makes American missionaries the dominant forces in the period.”

Our congratulations to Noelani – we’re looking forward to working with you at McGill!

Law professor Aaron Mills featured in Teaching for Learning blog

This week, Anishinaabe professor Aaron Mills was featured in the ‘Teaching for Learning McGill’ blog. He shared the core pedagogical practices of his class (Indigenous Constitutionalism, LAWG 508) that he “designed to introduce students to some foundations for understanding Anishinaabe law in particular.” This includes teaching, learning, and contributing in circle, a practice he became knowledgeable about through his grandmother, in his community, Couchiching First Nation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you, Aaron, for sharing your experience and knowledge with the McGill community. We wish you well in your online teaching this semester!

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