McGill Students at AFN’s Youth Summit on Language Revitalization

The Assembly of First Nations hosted an online National Youth Gathering from the Languages and Culture Sector virtually over the weekend of October 17th and 18th. This gathering, Spirit Speakers: Our Languages, Our Future, was originally scheduled for March 27th-30th 2020, however, due to health concerns stemming from COVID-19, the gathering was canceled.

The gathering’s goal was to create a collaborative discussion space for youth to share their experiences, best practices, successes, challenges, and recommendations regarding the revitalization, promotion, and maintenance of Indigenous languages.

One of the organizers of the gathering is Isabelle Zwicker, an Anishinaabe student who is currently at McGill studying Law. In the gathering itself, Zwicker helped facilitate and moderate discussions as well as making sure that the gathering ran smoothly. As well, Vanessa Racine (an Anishinaabe student at McGill and Administrative Coordinator for ISCEI) attended the conference.

Some of the concerns that participants voiced were the lack of visibility of Indigenous languages both in schools as well as in general media.

The ideas, experiences, and comments from the First Nations youth participants were compiled into a report and will be shared with the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) and other leaders in language revitalization.

Indigenous Student Alliance raises funds for Joyce Echaquan

Over the last couple of weeks, the Indigenous Student Alliance (ISA) raised over 600.00$ to support Joyce Echaquan‘s family. In order to raise the funds, the ISA raffled a purse (see image) made by Karahkwinetha (Sage) Goodleaf, who is a Kanienʼkehá:ka student at McGill University.

The ISA is a community-based group of Indigenous students and allies working to improve student life on campus. They provide integrative support for Indigenous peoples attending McGill University, so that we may connect and share our Indigenous ways of knowing with each other and with non-I

ndigenous peoples in the community. Their vision is to develop networks and partnerships with university student groups and organizations through learning–teaching relationships that foster real and meaningful human development and community solidarity.

Joyce was a member of Atikamekw Nation from Manawan and was supporting seven children, may she rest in power. If you would like to further support Joyce’s family, donations are still being accepted on the GoFundMe page.

 

 

 

Video celebrating 10th year of Indigenous Studies Field Course (IDFC 500)

Rahskwahseron:nis – Building Bridges is a recent video presented by Indigenous Access McGill and the School of Social Work, celebrating ten years of the IDFC 500 Indigenous Studies Field Course class. The course “provides an opportunity for Social Work, Law, Medicine and Anthropology students to learn about Haudenosaunee cultures and worldviews, with particular emphasis on linkages to students’ practice areas.” Watch the video here:

Noelani Arista’s “The Kingdom and the Republic” wins major book award

Incoming McGill history professor and Director of the Indigenous Studies program, Noelani Arista, was awarded the Best 2019 First Book in Native American and Indigenous Studies Prize earlier this year for her book, The Kingdom and the Republic: Sovereign Hawai’i and the Early United States (University of Pennsylvania Press)Professor Arista discusses her book in a recent article in the University of Hawai’i News:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Noted were her use of previously unused written historical records in the Hawaiian language, and her ability to contextualize Hawaiian history in “Hawaiian understandings of the past.” David Chang, of the University of Minnesota, says that with this book, Arista “transforms the way we understand Hawai’i in the crucial decades between 1820 and 1840. She upends a simplistic colonial historiography that makes American missionaries the dominant forces in the period.”

Our congratulations to Noelani – we’re looking forward to working with you at McGill!

Law professor Aaron Mills featured in Teaching for Learning blog

This week, Anishinaabe professor Aaron Mills was featured in the ‘Teaching for Learning McGill’ blog. He shared the core pedagogical practices of his class (Indigenous Constitutionalism, LAWG 508) that he “designed to introduce students to some foundations for understanding Anishinaabe law in particular.” This includes teaching, learning, and contributing in circle, a practice he became knowledgeable about through his grandmother, in his community, Couchiching First Nation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you, Aaron, for sharing your experience and knowledge with the McGill community. We wish you well in your online teaching this semester!

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