Community Engagement Funding: Apply before January 15

ISCEI would like to remind the Indigenous McGill Community that there are funding opportunities available through the Community Engagement Fund. The next deadline for this fund is January 15th. 

This fund supports meetings and visits with Indigenous community organizations; bringing community members to McGill; experiential learning opportunities for students on and off-campus; and other creative partnership opportunities for Indigenous community support on and off-campus.  Some examples include Guest Lecturer compensation, using funds to purchase gift cards, seed funding for larger projects on campus, etc.

All applications will be reviewed by a committee. Funding can be used within 12 months of the review date. To apply for community engagement funding, please apply using this form.

Student RA Job Opportunity: Bicentennial (Share widely)

 

ISCEI and the Bicentennial Working Group are looking for a part-time research assistant to help in the research, planning and logistical coordination of the Bicentennial Anniversary Program. Applicants must have a strong understanding and awareness of Indigenous-centered methodology and community. The research involved will focus on McGill’s history with Indigenous communities, and the RA will be reporting to Indigenous Initiatives (Office of the Provost).

If you know of a student who would be interested in this position, please pass this along to them. Indigenous applicants will be prioritized, but non-Indigenous applicants are still welcomed.

 

Primary Responsibilities

Under the supervision of Indigenous Initiatives (Office of the Provost, Vice-Principal Academic and Finance), the selected student will:

Program

  • Conduct research on topics as deemed relevant to the Bicentennial Indigenous Program. This will include, but not limited to the following topics:
  •  McGill’s Indigenous history:
  • Historical figures, notable alumni
  • Relationships to communities
  • Milestones
  • Attend meetings with the committee and take minutes if need be.
  • Assist with internal communications as required
  • Assist with stakeholder mapping and engagement.

 

Administrative

  • Meeting minutes
  • Information management
  • Logistical planning and coordination

 

Required skills and knowledge

  • Professionalism and ability to interact with various stakeholder groups including academics, administrators, students, and external contacts.
  • Ability to work autonomously and as part of a team.
  • Demonstrated writing and communications skills.
  • Knowledge of, and prior experience in conducting research in University Archives is an asset.
  • English, spoken and written. Proficiency in French would be an asset.

 

 

Wage: $15/hour

Hours: 15-20 hours/week

Closing date: N/A

Duration: ~15 weeks (Dec.. 2020 – April . 2021)

To apply: Please email cover letter (including student ID no.) and résumé to iscei@mcgill.ca

 

The Indigenous-led movement to Change the Name: A short recap of the last two years

On November 17th, McGill announced the new name of the Men’s Varsity Team: the Redbirds. This comes after many years and generations of Indigenous students who fought for the name change. Below is a very abridged history of the recent history of the name change:

Following the large protest in 2018, led by members of the Indigenous community, students continued to push for change through tabling and entering classrooms to further explain McGill’s history with mascots and names. These actions were to further remind other students to vote for the name change during the SSMU referendum. Although the motion did pass within the Student Union, students did not hear a formal announcement by McGill and were continually being handed insults, rude comments and at times, being yelled at by senior staff.

Following the lack of communication by the University, students led another campaign to stop the renewal of the Fee to Improve Athletics – during a Board of Governors meeting, students dropped a large banner off Leacock, demanding that Athletics needs to change their name before improving a facility meant for all students.

It was only announced in April 2019 that the name would change, months after being silent. Following the announcement, male Indigenous athletes were invited to join discussions on the name change as well as other students and staff within Athletics. However, Athletics has failed to discuss how Indigenous athletes can be supported in their team sports and much more work needs to be done within Athletics to make it a welcoming space.

 

 

Students Call for More Support across Campus

In a recent article from the Bull and Bear, a student-led newspaper on campus, Indigenous students call for more support across campus. As the recent announcement of the Men’s Teamname being changed to Redbird, a sense of closure was finally brought to students who fought for the name to be changed.

In the article, Indigenous students, alumni, and faculty discuss the lack of support systems currently in place and push for more Indigenous faculty and staff. One student shared her experience at the Wellness Hub, stating that multiple stereotypes were being perpetrated on her by doctors and psychiatrists while trying to seek help.

As well, one Indigenous graduate noted that McGill is only beginning to address these issues and that more work needs to be done. As the Indigenous student population is very small, erasure and isolation from student services on campus occur more often within the community.

You can read the full article here.

“Knowledge Mobilization: from SSHRC Buzzword to Actual Meaningful Thing”: Online Workshop for Graduate Students

The Centre for Indigenous Research and Community-Led Engagement (CIRCLE) announced a SAGE online workshop on Friday Nov. 13th 2020, from 12:00-1:30 PM (PST) with Dr. Shiri Pasternak titled: “Knowledge Mobilization: from SSHRC Buzzword to Actual Meaningful Thing”.

Have you come across the term ‘knowledge mobilization’ when tediously filling out grant applications? Have you wondered why this language of war is used to describe the thing you are quietly doing in libraries and in your room? And what you can do, beyond peer-review publishing, to impact the world with your research? Using Yellowhead Institute resources, tools, and “collaterals” as examples (plus some other great forms of public intervention), this workshop is a crash course on making knowledge matter beyond normal academic outputs.

Shiri Pasternak is a professor of criminology at Ryerson University in Toronto. She is also the Research Director at the Yellowhead Institute, a First Nations’-focused and -led think tank based at Ryerson. She is the author of the award-winning book Grounded Authority: the Algonqins of Barriere Lake Against the State, and a bunch of other articles and essays all obsessively focused on abolishing the settler state.

Registration is limited and open to UVic graduate students, faculty, and staff as well as Indigenous graduate students throughout Canada. Register in advance for this meeting: https://uvic.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZMrd-mqpzsjG9UX1QoHThmKFgTPfLGMS5Lb

 

Kitchen-table Chat on Indigenous Space at the Dept. of Family Medicine

On Thursday November 12th, the Department of Family Medicine invites Indigenous students, faculty and community members from McGill and beyond the University to attend a kitchen table conversation to share thoughts about what such a space can be, look like and offer to students, faculty and the University community.
The Department of Family Medicine intends to create an Indigenous space at their location, 5858 Cote des Neiges. The Dept. has acquired additional space in the building and part of the planning is to dedicate a space – 1 or 2 rooms, that could become a center for Indigenous health research for not only Family Medicine, but for the whole McGill community.
In Family Medicine, Richard Budgell and Alex McComber have been asked to facilitate discussions around what this Indigenous space could be, the look, the activities, etc. There is no pre-registration and the McGill Indigenous community is invited to attend, even for only a part of the gathering.
Please contact alex.mccomber@mcgill.ca to confirm your interest to participate

Michèle Audette Guest Lectures INDG 200

On November 4th, McGill’s INDG 200 course welcomed Innu political activist Michèle Audette for a Q&A session with students concerning Indigenous Feminisms. Students were given the opportunity to connect and ask questions about her work and its relevance to the larger Indigenous communities.

Michèle Audette has served as president of Femmes autochtones du Québec (Quebec Native Women) and the Native Women’s Association of Canada. In 2017, she was appointed as one of the five commissioners of the government’s national inquiry: Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG).

When Canadian society creates systems in which violence becomes pervasive, and which puts Indigenous women at risk, we fail our collective responsibilities.” – Michèle Audette 

You can find more information here about her work on the national inquiry on MMIWG.

Blog authors are solely responsible for the content of the blogs listed in the directory. Neither the content of these blogs, nor the links to other web sites, are screened, approved, reviewed or endorsed by McGill University. The text and other material on these blogs are the opinion of the specific author and are not statements of advice, opinion, or information of McGill.