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ISCEI Community Engagement Fund: Fall Funding for Students, Faculty and Staff

Through ISCEI, McGill students, staff, and faculty members are invited to apply for seed funding to support meetings and visits with Indigenous community organizations; bringing community members to McGill; experiential learning opportunities for students on and off campus; and other creative partnership opportunities for Indigenous community support on and off campus.

The deadline to apply for Fall Funding is September 15th. Students, staff and faculty can submit an application through our website, or directly apply here. Funding can be used within 12 months of the review date.

Click here to apply!

‘‘Don’t forget that you’re a goose!’’ Exhibition resulting from sharing circles held in April 2021 with members of the Indigenous community of Montréal/Tiohtià:ke

“Don’t forget that you’re a goose!” is a photovoice exhibition; a result of sharing circles held in April 2021 with members of the Indigenous community of Montréal/Tiohtià:ke who are from different Nations. The photos and their captions were proposed by the participants to fuel the conversations about their relations with the city of Montréal and in the city’s public spaces.

The objective is to integrate different perspectives to understand how to foster both Indigenous resurgence and the (re)negotiation of relations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people. This exhibition will eventually be presented in a public space in the city of Montréal.

Click here to view the online exhibition. 

 

Credits:

Pictures and captions: Richard Budgell, Vicky Boldo, Carole Brazeau, Geneviève Buckell, Craig Commanda, Chloe Polson, Jennifer Buckell and Carling Sioui.

Storymap by: Marie-Eve Drouin-Gagné, Stéphane Guimont Marceau, Jennifer Buckell and Carling Sioui.

Geese drawing: Kelly Minh Quan Vu.

This project is funded by SSHRC.

Indigenous Art on Public Display at McGill University

The McGill Visual Arts Collection is committed to strengthening local, contemporary Indigenous art practices in Canada and is actively working to increase the diversity and visibility of Indigenous art – modern and contemporary – across all campuses.

The VAC has created an interactive map where you are able to navigate the various Indigenous art collections publicly displayed on campus.

Click here to access the map and learn more about VAC’s initiative. 

Terry Young joins ISCEI as Project Manager

Terry Young will be joining ISCEI as Program Manager, starting full time in October.

The Project Manager supports and manages the research activities of the developing Institute by forging strong relationships and identifying opportunities for collaboration, both among McGill-based researchers, as well as in partnership with local Indigenous communities.

Terry will be facilitating research and relationship-building through regular event planning, supervision of ISCEI’s administrative coordinator, and development of initiatives, including the development of Indigenous Language Revitalization research and programming; Indigenous Elder-, Artist-, and Writer-in-Residence programs; and regular academic workshops and symposia.

Terry Young is Wolastoqiyik (Maliseet) and hails from Kingsclear First Nation located in New Brunswick. For the last 15 years, he’s resided on the Kanienkehaka Territory of Tiotake (Montreal) with his husband Justin Mahoney.

Young holds a Bachelor of Arts Degree from St. Thomas University, with a double major in Native Studies and Anthropology. He’s also received formal training on Community Planning and Development from Dalhousie University.

Both a pipe carrier for his people and a carrier of traditional Wolastoqew songs, Young has participated for many years in ceremonies with various Nations from all over Turtle Island. He is also a traditional ash basket maker, a craft he’s honed for more than 20 years.

Congratulations Terry!

Pick Your Path Summer Programming Begins August 2nd

Pick Your Path is an online career exploration and mentorship program for Indigenous youth happening from August 2nd to the 13th. Pick Your Path is a program developed by BRANCHES, with the goal to pique the interest of Indigenous students in education by offering an opportunity that gives exposure to various areas of study.

Pick Your Path! (PYP) is an online learning experience for Indigenous summer students between the ages of 16-25. BRANCHES will be providing students the opportunity to have a paid professional development and education experience from a distance. PYP students will meet weekly with an Indigenous post-secondary student mentor, with the program coordinator, and in a group setting. Additionally, students will attend online workshops and seminars led by Indigenous and non-Indigenous professionals and professors.

To learn more about BRANCHES, click here!

Sandra-Lynn Leclaire Presents “Reclaiming Haudenosaunee Archival Language Sources” in Owén:na Tweathá:rakw

On Thursday August 5th at 2pm, Sandra-Lynn Leclaire will be presenting “Reclaiming Haudenosaunee Archival Language Sources” in the panel series, Owén:na Tweathá:rakw.

Owén:na Tweathá:rakw is a panel series co-organized by ISCEI and Ionkwahronkha’onhátie’ with the goal of furthering knowledge and awareness about tools for language learning, transmission, and documentation, and identifying topics and tools to help language learners gain knowledge and skills in areas of interest in their language-learning paths.

More on Sandra-Lynn’s talk:

An important aspect of language revitalization that is often overlooked is the use of primary sources due to a lack of collaborative efforts and sharing of knowledge between linguists, historians, archivists, and Indigenous communities. One goal of my research is to provide Haudenosaunee community members with information about what Haudenosaunee language archival sources exist and how they can gain access to them. A large focus of my work has been on the manuscripts that French Jesuit missionaries worked on in the 1600s and early 1700s. With their advanced linguistic knowledge, they created and compiled both dictionaries and grammatical sketches. The work of the Jesuits and other Europeans is often seen as controversial, but these language documents have played a formative role in language revitalization. Primary source dictionaries and grammatical sketches can help us to comprehend historical changes in both Kanien’keha history and the Kanien’keha language.

If you are a second language speaker of Kanien’keha and would like to attend this talk, please email vanessa.racine2@mcgill.ca for more information.

National Building Reconciliation Forum Registration Now Open

The registration for the 2021 National Building Reconciliation Forum is now open!

The National Building Reconciliation Forum seeks to rally and bring together the main actors in the world of Indigenous education and all post-secondary institutions in Quebec and across Canada. As well, it will serve as a springboard to ensure that the ideas discussed at the forum come to fruition and that they help support Indigenous people in the process of taking charge of education by and for First Peoples and transforming Québec and Canadian society.

You can register with the link below:

https://event.fourwaves.com/348eb277-a0b3-4acf-9388-a485e95dfe4e/pages

New Courses in Indigenous Health: FMED 506 and FMED 527

McGill’s Department of Family Medicine is happy to announce that students can now register for two upcoming Indigenous Health courses. Indigenous Perspectives Decolonizing Health Research (FMED 506), a one-credit course, will be offered in fall 2021 by Prof. Alex McComber, Kanien’keha:ka from Kahnawake Territory, QC. This graduate foundation course explores Indigenous-grounded health promotion in primary health care, with the goal to foster more meaningful patient and community engagement in research and practice. Inuit Health in the Canadian Context (FMED527), a one-credit course, will be offered in winter 2022 by Prof. Richard Budgell, Labrador Inuk. The course will explore the histories, perspectives and contemporary realities of Inuit health in the four regions of Inuit Nunangat (the Inuit homeland) with a particular focus on the Nunavik region of northern Quebec.

You can register for these courses on Minerva.

 

FMED 506: Indigenous Perspectives Decolonizing Health Research (1 credit) – Fall 2021 by Alex McComber

This graduate foundation course explores Indigenous-grounded health promotion in primary health care, with the goal to foster more meaningful patient and community engagement in research and practice. This course will explore the nature of Indigenous Peoples’ ways of understanding the world and cultural ways of knowing and doing, with focus on health and wellness. It will review the Canadian history of colonization and assimilation, and the outcomes and impacts through the lens of Indigenous Peoples. The course will review the powershift as Indigenous Peoples, scholars and communities participate, share and control the health and wellness clinical and research agenda.

FMED527: Inuit Health in the Canadian Context (1 credit) – Winter 2022 by Richard Budgell

The course will explore the histories, perspectives and contemporary realities of Inuit health in the four regions of Inuit Nunangat (the Inuit homeland) with a particular focus on the Nunavik region of northern Quebec. The Inuit of Nunavik are the second-largest Inuit community in Canada, with a population of 11,000 living in 14 communities. Nunavik is part of the McGill Réseau universitaire intégré de santé et services sociaux. That gives McGill’s Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences a unique rationale, and opportunity, to offer, under the sponsorship of Family Medicine, a course on Inuit health in the Canadian context.

Gabrielle Doreen awarded Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship

Yakotennikonhrare (Gabrielle) Doreen has been awarded the Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship (Vanier CGS) and is one of the 2021 Vanier Canada Scholars for her doctoral project titled:

Wampum Theories: An Appropriate Philosophical Foundation for Kanienke’hà:ka Land-based Immersion Schools

Gabrielle’s project ranked #2 out of 195, and was featured in the launch of the official results. Congratulations Gabrielle!

The Vanier CGS is valued at $50,000 per year for three years during doctoral studies and considers three equally weighted selection criteria: Academic Excellence, Research Potential, and Leadership.
More on Vanier CGS:
The Government of Canada launched the Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarships (Vanier CGS) program in 2008 to strengthen Canada’s ability to attract and retain world-class doctoral students and establish Canada as a global centre of excellence in research and higher learning. Vanier Scholars demonstrate leadership skills and a high standard of scholarly achievement in graduate studies in the social sciences and humanities, natural sciences and/or engineering and health.

 

 

 

McGill Selected for Thematic Workshop at the National Building Reconciliation Forum

“McGill University’s 52 Calls to Action; Indigenous Awareness Weeks” has been selected for the thematic workshop “Raising awareness among post-secondary institutions about the realities of First Peoples” to be held on Wednesday, September 22 from 1:30 to 3:00 pm at the National Building Reconciliation Forum 2021.

The National Building Reconciliation Forum seeks to rally and bring together the main actors in the world of Indigenous education and all post-secondary institutions in Quebec and across Canada. As well, it will serve as a springboard to ensure that the ideas discussed at the forum come to fruition and that they help support Indigenous people in the process of taking charge of education by and for First Peoples and transforming Québec and Canadian society.

Learn more about the National Building Reconciliation Forum here. 

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