Introducing Benilde Mizero

A belated welcome to Benilde Mizero, who is working this semester as the language consultant for LING 415/610, Linguistic Field Methods. This semester, the class is studying Kirundi, a Bantu language of Burundi. Benilde is in the Linguistics Department many days meeting with students for elicitation sessions in the Fieldwork Lab. If you see him around, you can say kaze! [kaa.dze] ‘welcome!’ or urakomeye? [u.ɾa.kʰo.me.je] ‘how are you?’.

My name is Benilde Mizero, I was born in 1993 in Burundi, where I completed my primary and secondary school before moving to Burkina Faso for postsecondary studies. About a year after, I immigrated to Canada as an international student. In January 2014, I attended Saint Boniface University (Winnipeg, MB) where I obtained a Bachelor of Science degree with a joint major in Biochemistry and Microbiology in 2018. After that, I attended the University of Manitoba (Winnipeg, MB) where I completed my master’s in chemistry in December 2020. Ten months after, I enrolled in the PhD program in environmental chemistry at McGill university. Apart from my obvious passion for chemistry and sciences in general, I really enjoy watching and playing sports (particularly boxing) as well as meeting and connecting with new people from all over the world.

Colloquium: Susana Béjar, 23/02

Susana Béjar from the University of Toronto will giving a talk entitled “Person, Agree, and Derived Predicates” as part of the McGill Linguistics Colloquium Series on Friday, February 23th at 3:30pm in room 433 of the Education Building. All are welcome to attend! For the abstract and for any other colloquium information, please visit the Colloquium Series web page: https://www.mcgill.ca/linguistics/events/colloquium-series.

Afternoon Bantu Workshop, May 3rd

Please join us for an afternoon Bantu Workshop, to celebrate the end of this semester’s Bobangi Field Methods class. There will be presentations by some of the undergraduate and graduate students, our Bobangi consultant Mpoke Mimpongo (UQAM), and invited speaker Jenneke van der Wal (Harvard). All talks will take place in McGill Education Building, room 216. The schedule is below–all are welcome!

12:30–12:45 – Jiaer Tao, A Study on object asymmetry in Bobangi

12:45–1:00 – Benjamine Oldham, Object marking in Bobangi: A pronominal incorporation analysis

1:00–1:15 – Renata Masucci, Tone in Bobangi

1:15–1:30 – Paulina Elias, Object asymmetry in Bobangi

1:30–1:45 – BREAK

1:45–2:00 – Sara Carrier-Bordeleau, Verbal reduplication in Bobangi

2:00–2:15 – Jasmine Zhang, Vowel sandhi in Bobangi

2:15–2:30 – Emily Kellison-Linn, Intonation of polar questions and declarative statements in Bobangi

2:30–2:45 – Yeong Park, High boundary tone in Bobangi

2:45–3:00 – Rosie Barnes, Agent nominalizations in Bobangi

3:00–3:15 – BREAK

3:15–3:45 – Mpoke Mimpongo (UQAM), TBA

3:45–4:45 – Invited Speaker – Jenneke van der Wal (Harvard University)

Title: Investigating focus marking in Luganda and Lingala

Abstract: While it is admittedly difficult to investigate information structure in an unfamiliar language, in this talk I hope to show that there are some manageable diagnostics for focus that can be applied in elicitation. Based on data from Luganda and Lingala I show why the discoveries about focus marking in Bantu languages are crucial for understanding both the synchronic analysis and the diachronic development of focus. (full abstract)

Leon Bergen mini-course this week

Leon Bergen will be visiting McGill this week, and will be giving a mini-course on the Rational Speech Act model, and its applications. One session will take place during the regular Semantics Reading Group meeting time. The full schedule is below, all are welcome to attend:

Monday March 20, 4-5.30 (Education Building, Room 434)
Tuesday March  21, 4-5.30 (Linguistics Building, Room 117)
Thursday March 23, 12-1 (Room 117, regular lingtea time slot)
Friday March 24, 3-4.30 (Room 117, regular semantics reading group slot)
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