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Colloquium, 12/6 – Jason Brenier

The next talk in the Linguistics colloquium series will be by Jason Brenier (Georgian Partners) on Friday, December 6th at 3:30 pm in ARTS W-20. Title and abstract to come!

LING/DISE Indigenous languages search, 12/2 – Ryan DeCaire

Please join us this afternoon for the last of the three talks in connection with the LING/DISE search in Indigenous Languages. Speaker: Ryan DeCaire (UofT) Coordinates: December 2nd, 3:00–4:30 in Arts 260 (to be followed by a reception) Title: Tertiary Education for Indigenous Language Revitalization Abstract: Indigenous communities, some now for decades, have been working tirelessly to maintain […]

Heather Goad at University of Vienna

Heather Goad gave two colloquia at the University of Vienna this past week: “An unexpected source of footing in Québec French” (in collaboration with Gui Garcia (PhD 2017) and Natália Guzzo (post-doc until 2019)) and “How many types of s are there?”

Congratulations Dr. Liz Smeets!

Congratulations to newly-minted Dr. Liz Smeets, who recently defended her dissertation “Conditions on L1 transfer in L2 discourse-syntax mappings: The case of Clitic Left Dislocation in Italian and Romanian”, supervised by Lydia White and Lisa Travis. Below Liz is pictured with supervisor Lydia White, ceremoniously moving her photo (with help from baby Otis) from “current […]

MCQLL Meeting, 11/27 — Gemma Huang

This week at MCQLL, Gemma Huang will present her ongoing project on comparing phonotactic probability models. Overview: Phonotactics is a branch of phonology that studies the restrictions on permissible combinations of phonemes. The adoption of words is governed by systematic intuitions on the likelihood of different combinations of sounds in a language. For example, between […]

P* Reading Group, 11/25

This week, Zhiyao will lead a discussion of Kerry-Ryan et al.’s (2018) “Towards End-to-End Prosody Transfer for Expressive Speech Synthesis with Tacotron”. The reading is available at bit.ly/PReadingGroup. P* Group takes place at 2:45 pm on Monday in room 117 of the Linguistics Building. All are welcome to attend!

Syntax/Semantics Reading Group, 11/25 — Carol-Rose Little and Mary Moroney

The next syntax-semantics reading group meeting will take place Monday (25/11) at 14:30 in room 002. We will have two guest speakers from Cornell University: Carol-Rose Little and Mary Moroney. The titles and abstracts for their presentations are found below: Carol-Rose Little Title: Absolutive case assignment and the Mapping Hypothesis Abstract: In this talk, I […]

LING/DISE Indigenous Languages search invited speaker, 11/26 – James Crippen

Please join us for the second of three talks in connection with the LING/DISE search in Indigenous Languages. Speaker: Dr. James Crippen (UBC) Coordinates: November 26th, 3:00–4:30 in EDUC 624 (to be followed by a reception) Title: Theoretical analysis of Tlingit’s verbs and consequences for language documentation and learning Abstract:  The Tlingit language is a First Nations […]

announcement: LING/DISE Indigenous languages search invited speaker, 12/2 – Ryan DeCaire

Please join us next week for the last of the three talks in connection with the LING/DISE search in Indigenous Languages. Speaker: Ryan DeCaire (UofT) Coordinates: December 2nd, 3:00–4:30 in Arts 260 (to be followed by a reception) Title: Tertiary Education for Indigenous Language Revitalization Abstract: Indigenous communities, some now for decades, have been working tirelessly to maintain […]

Bale & Schwarz in Linguistics and Philosophy

An article co-authored by Alan Bale and Bernhard Schwarz, titled “Proportional readings of ‘many’ and ‘few’: the case for an underspecified measure function,” has just appeared online in Linguistics and Philosophy. The article can be found online here: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10988-019-09284-5

Syntax/Semantics Reading Group, 11/18 — Mathieu Paillé

The next syntax-semantics reading group meeting will take place Monday (18/11) at 14:30 in room 002.  Mathieu will be presenting work entitled: Contradiction in copular clauses.    Abstract: Some copular clauses, like “This fork is a spoon,” appear to be contradictions. The effect appears specifically when the subject and predicate are thought of as forming a […]

LING/DISE Indigenous Languages search invited speaker, 11/19 – Kari Chew

Please join us for the first of three talks in connection with the LING/DISE search in Indigenous Languages. Speaker: Dr. Kari Chew (University of Victoria) Coordinates: November 19th, 3:00–4:30 in EDUC 624 (to be followed by a reception) Title: Weaving Words: Situating linguistics, education, and language reclamation within a culturally-significant metaphor Abstract:  Drawing on a five-year study with […]

PhD dissertation defense, 11/22 – Liz Smeets

Please join us for the PhD oral defence of Liz Smeets, Friday November 22nd at 2:30pm in Ferrier room 476. The dissertation is titled: “Conditions on L1 transfer in L2 discourse-syntax mappings: The case of Clitic Left Dislocation in Italian and Romanian.” The defence will be followed by a reception in the Linguistics lounge (room 212).

McGill @ YYC Pronouns Workshop

Justin Royer traveled to Calgary to present “Pronominal classifiers and definiteness in Chuj” at the YYC Pronouns Workshop, held at the University of Calgary November 15th and 16th. Ileana Paul also presented collaborative work with Lisa Travis, “The architecture of pronouns and demonstratives in Malagasy.” The full program can be found on the workshop website.

Syntax-Semantics Reading Group, 11/11 — Richard Compton

The next syntax-semantics reading group meeting group will take place Monday (11/11) at 14:30 in room 002. Richard Compton will be giving a presentation entitled: On pronouns in Inuktut. The schedule for the syntax-semantics reading group can be found at the following link: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1KmuPoC7LolwS6Z79qZs6BFbgCnYOED8An3l3IA-pOuk/edit?usp=sharing

P* Reading Group, 11/11 — Heather Goad

Next week, Heather will lead a discussion of Aldrete et al.’s (2019) “Tone slips in Cantonese: Evidence for early phonological encoding”, on Monday (Nov. 11) 2:45-3:45pm in room 117 of the Linguistics Department.

Special presentation in prosodylab, 11/13 – Buxo-Lugo, Kilbourn-Ceron

On Wed November 13 Andrés Buxó-Lugo (University of Maryland) will present on his research in the prosodylab-meeting (10.30am-11.30am) in Room 117 in Linguistics (1085 Dr. Penfield Avenue).  The world is not enough to explain lengthening of phonological competitors Speakers tend to lengthen words when a phonologically overlapping word has recently been produced. Although there are multiple accounts […]

Colloquium talk, 11/15 – John Alderete

The first talk in our 2019-2020 McGill Linguistics Colloquium Series will be given by John Alderete (Simon Fraser University) on Friday, November 15th at 3:30 pm in BIRKS 111. The title of the talk is “Speech errors and phonological patterns: Integrating insights from psycholinguistic and linguistic theory”. All are welcome to attend. Abstract:  In large collections of speech errors, phonological […]

Goad & White in Linguistic Approaches to Bilingualism

Heather Goad & Lydia White have just published an epistemological paper ‘Prosodic effects on L2 grammars’ in Linguistic Approaches to Bilingualism. The paper, along with 15 commentaries, can be found here: https://www.jbe-platform.com/content/journals/10.1075/lab.19043.goa

LING/DISE Indigenous Languages search invited speaker – Kari Chew, 11/19

Please join us next week for the first of three talks in connection with the LING/DISE search in Indigenous Languages. Speaker: Dr. Kari Chew (University of Victoria) Coordinates: November 19th, 3:00–4:30 in EDUC 624 (to be followed by a reception) Title: Weaving Words: Situating linguistics, education, and language reclamation within a culturally-significant metaphor Abstract:  Drawing on a five-year […]

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