Jaswant Guzder on Child Cultural Consultations

Jaswant Guzder, head of Child Psychiatry at the Jewish General Hospital, talks about Cultural Consultation sessions with children. What are the principles of child cultural competence, what are some typical agendas during child cultural consultations, and what are some themes of concern?

Roberto Lewis-Fernández on the Cultural Formulation Interview

“What should we know about you that contextualizes you and understands you from a cultural lens?”

Roberto Lewis-Fernández, Professor of Clinical Psychiatry at Columbia University talks about the Cultural Formulation Interview (CFI): what are its uses, is it only for use with people from a cultural minority, and how can practitioners learn to use it?

Critical Neuroscience

Select lectures of the Critical Neuroscience course are now online. All of our lectures are downloadable, feel free to share them! To download any of our videos, click on “vimeo” on the bottom right hand side of each video player, this will bring you to the video’s vimeo page. There, you will see four buttons underneath the description of the video. Click on “download” (the last button), right click on the file name and choose “Download linked file”.

The Critical Neuroscience course provides an overview of recent controversies surrounding cognitive neuroscience and the implications of recent advancements for psychiatry, industry, policy and other areas of social life. It will present key studies in social and cultural neuroscience from the last two decades and examine the potentials and limitations of predominant methodologies, particularly neuroimaging. The course will present the interdisciplinary project of critical neuroscience as a framework and set of tools with which to critically analyze interpretations of neuroscience data in the academic literature, their representation in popular domains and more broadly, the growth of neurocultures since the Decade of the Brain. The course will provide a forum to problematize, and consider alternatives to, neurobiological reductionism in psychiatry, areas of neuroethics, cultural neuroscience and neuropolicy, attending to the models, metaphors and political contexts of mainstream brain research. It will also explore various avenues for engagement between neuroscience, social sciences and the humanities.


Lecture 1: Critical Neuroscience and the Cultural Brain
How do we make sense of what is going on in the field of neuroscience? How can we make sense of the many discourses about neuroscience? Lecture given by Suparna Choudhury of McGill University, Montreal and Jan Slaby of Freie Universitat, Berlin. Part of the Summer School in Social and Cultural Psychiatry from the Division of Transcultural Psychiatry at McGill University.

Lecture #2 An overview

Dr. Laurence Kirmayer gives an overview on the field of Critical Neuroscience, covering varieties of critical neuroscience, cultural constructions of the brain, reductionism in psychiatry, the social brain, cultural neuroscience and neurodiversity and posthuman futures. Part of the Summer Programme in Social and Cultural Psychiatry from the Division of Social and Transcultural Psychiatry at McGill University.

 

Lecture #3.1 Philosophy of Mind and Neuroscience

Ian Gold discusses the history of the mind as a concept, covering Cartesian mind/body dualism, cognitive scaffolding, the embodied and embedded mind, and situated cognition. What is the mind? Where is the mind located? Where does cognition take place? Part of the Summer Programme in Social and Cultural Psychiatry from the Division of Social and Transcultural Psychiatry at McGill University.

 

Lecture #3.2 Philosophy of Mind and Neuroscience

Ian Gold continues his talk on the philosophy of the mind, covering reductionism of the mind sciences, psychology and psychiatry to neuroscience. Part of the Summer Programme in Social and Cultural Psychiatry from the Division of Social and Transcultural Psychiatry at McGill University.

Lecture #4 Resting State – The Question of Baseline

Daniel Margulies, PhD talks us through the history of the concept of baseline in cognitive neuroscience and the future directions of this field of neuroscience. Part of the Summer Programme in Social and Cultural Psychiatry.

Lecture #5 Neuroimaging

Dr. Amir Raz gives an overview on the different types of neuroimaging methods: NMR, MRI, fMRI, ERP, EEG, PET, Cyclotrone, TMS and CT. Part of the Summer Programme in Social and Cultural Psychiatry from the Division of Social and Transcultural Psychiatry at McGill University.

Lecture #6 Brain Images and Neurosubjectivities

Dr. Suparna Choudhury and Dr. Jan Slaby talk about objective self-fashioning, how neuroscience is impacting selfhood. Is our brain our sense of identity? Does framing ourselves in terms of the brain (ie using “endorphin challenged” instead of “alcoholic”) take away responsibility for ourselves? How plastic is our brain? Do we have a neurosignature? What affect does looking at the brain have on how we understand ourselves and our actions? Part of the Summer Programme in Social and Cultural Psychiatry from the Division of Social and Transcultural Psychiatry at McGill University.

 

Lecture #7 Culture and Psychosis

Dr. Ian Gold talks about the role of culture in psychosis. The popularity of the film The Truman Show has led a people who believe that they are part of a secret television show. Gold discusses social/environmental factors that have been shown to lead to schizophrenia, such as living in a large urban centres. What happens when we consider the large online community that we increasingly spend more time in? Part of the Summer Programme in Social and Cultural Psychiatry from the Division of Social and Transcultural Psychiatry at McGill University.

Lecture #8 Neurophenomenology in Psychiatry

Dr. Laurence Kirmayer speaks on phenomenology and the ways in which it has mutated in a North American context. How are people framing the nature of their mental illness? How can we think of embodied experience (such as sleep paralysis) through metaphor as a bridge between neurology and a cultural point of view? Part of the Summer Programme in Social and Cultural Psychiatry from the Division of Social and Transcultural Psychiatry at McGill University.

 

Laurence Kirmayer – Revisioning Psychiatry

Laurence Kirmayer recently gave a new version of his lecture “Revisioning psychiatry: Cultural phenomenology, critical neuroscience, and global mental health”. The talk was presented as a guest lecture at the FPR-UCLA Programme for Culture, Brain, Development, and Mental Health in January 2013. Click here for more information on the programme.

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